Tag Archives: Shaun Rein

How Tencent, Alibaba dominate private business – Shaun Rein

Private companies in China can only survive when they team up with Tencent or Alibaba, creating a business scene that is unprecedented, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order  to the South China Morning Post. “They basically have a gun to your head and you have to choose which of the two companies you want to work with.”

Foreign brands can both over-localize and under-localize – Shaun Rein

For foreign brands working on the China market is tough, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. They can both over-localized and under-localize, he tells Hicom-Asia. Some of the pitfalls for foreign companies.

In China, branding and politics get in each others way – Shaun Rein

When brands enter China, they not only have to figure out what their demanding customers want, but also have a good look at politics, argues business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, in a wide-ranging interview at Knowledge CKGSB.

Western fashion brands fail on China’s millennials – Shaun Rein

China’s millennials are increasingly defining the country’s consumer space, and Western fashion brands fail to appeal to them, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to the South China Morning Post. Brands like Mark&Spencer failed because they focused on the middle-class, he says

IT-giants replace real estate tycoons in policy building – Shaun Rein

A strong shift from real estate tycoons to IT-giants marks a shift at China’s economy in the ongoing political meetings in Beijing, says author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to the South China Morning Post. “China is picking five to 10 private technology companies to make them national champions.”

Why do Chinese companies love Brazil? – Shaun Rein

Chinese insurance and investment conglomerate Fosun International snapped up Brazilian asset manager Guide Investimentos for US$52 million on Tuesday, reversing a trend of disinvestment after the central government came after conglomerates with excessive outbound investments. Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, explains in the South China Morning Post why Brazil is such a popular destination.

Crackdown on corruption has some side-effects – Shaun Rein

While President Xi Jinping’s crackdown on corruption is lauded by most, the campaign has some negative side-effects, says author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order in the South China Morning Post. Officials have become increasingly afraid to make larger decisions because they fear a possible backlash, he says.

In China, politics is crucial for business – Shaun Rein

China has become a politicized society, and countries and businesses can only ignore politics at their own peril. That is one of the key messages of political analyst Shaun Rein’s book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, and at the China Economic Review, he explains how that – in his view – works.

Risk management experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Foreign companies fear an increasing risk in China, now the government is tightening legal supervision, fighting corruption and banning business practices that were considered to be common up to a year ago. GSK might be one of the high-profile cases in the anti-corruption drive, but no foreign company or industry is not worried about those changes. The China Speakers Bureau can offer a range of experts on risk management in China.

Financial experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Now a massive row of Chinese companies, including Alibaba, are preparing for IPO´s, both at home at abroad, insights in China´s financial industry are more important than ever,

The government wants to allow market forces to decide what financial direction the country is taking, and because more than even capital is owned by Chinese citizens, just looking at what the central government in Beijing is doing, is not longer good enough.