Tag Archives: Mark Schaub

National rules for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

After local regulations in Beijing, Shanghai, and Chongqing to organize tests with self-driving cars, China’s central government now has issued national rules to streamline those tests, writes Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight.

E-commerce experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

If at any place the switch from brick-and-mortar is going fast, it is China. Permanent online consumers comment, exchange information, and buy 24/7. When you sit down in a restaurant, you first ask the code for the free wifi, before the menu. When you travel abroad, you constantly discuss with friends and family back how, what to buy, or what not to buy.

Foreign car makers cannot ignore China’s self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

China is leading the market of self-driving cars, because its size and the aggressive way the government is paving the road, literally, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub to the China Law Insight. But investing in China offers not only huge opportunities, the challenges are equally gargantuan. 

Why big data are not the new oil – Mark Schaub

Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub dives further into the legal consequences of self-driving cars. Big data – generated by cars – are not the same as oil, as some argue, he says. Privacy is a key issue, that did not matter to oil, he writes at the China Law Insight.

The Shanghai rules for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

After Beijing Shanghai has become the second city in the race to regulate self-driving cars. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub compared both regulations and draws from the differences some conclusions for Shanghai, he writes on the China Law Insight.

Blockchain: key for cybersecurity at self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

Self-driving cars are going to change our life beyond recognition. But there is a lot of work to be done on cybersecurity to let them drive safely, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight.  a sector in which major car manufacturers such as Audi, Daimler, Toyota, BMW, Nissan, Volvo rub shoulders with new electric vehicle manufacturers such as Tesla and are also vying with established tech giants such as Google, Baidu, Apple, Samsung, Tencent and competing with new tech such as ride-hailing companies such as Didi and Uber?

Strategy experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Making sense out of China has always been challenging, although the questions companies and people have to ask themselves change permanently. From a rather uregulated booming economy, now dealing we a tsunami of new rules, anti-corruption and a – relatively – slowing economy changes the strategic questions you have to deal with And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China´s strategic challenges. We have a selection here (but you can always ask for more).

Risk management experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Foreign companies fear an increasing risk in China, now the government is tightening legal supervision, fighting corruption and banning business practices that were considered to be common up to a year ago. GSK might be one of the high-profile cases in the anti-corruption drive, but no foreign company or industry is not worried about those changes. The China Speakers Bureau can offer a range of experts on risk management in China.

What about cybersecurity for self-driving cars? – Mark Schaub

China is diving fast into self-driving cars. But while cybersecurity has become a major issue in IT, in the combination of self-driving cars, cybersecurity is not getting the attention it deserves, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub on the China Law Insight, focusing on the legal risks and the actions the Chinese government did take.

One-Belt, One-Road: all roads lead to China

One of the major global initiatives by China was the One-Belt, One-Road (OBOR),reviving the old silk roads. And while it is an open platform, major trade partners of China are currently not part of the initiative, including Australia, the UK and the US. Major disputes, like the Ausgrid, Brexit and Hickley cases, might only add to the worries countries should have when looking at their relation with China, without being part of OBOR.