Tag Archives: Harry Broadman

Strategy experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Making sense out of China has always been challenging, although the questions companies and people have to ask themselves change permanently. From a rather uregulated booming economy, now dealing we a tsunami of new rules, anti-corruption and a – relatively – slowing economy changes the strategic questions you have to deal with And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China´s strategic challenges. We have a selection here (but you can always ask for more).

Experts on the US-China trade war at the China Speakers Bureau

Who to turn for advice to now US president Donald Trump seems still running a trade war with China – and the rest of the world? A few experts at the China Speakers Bureau have started to make sense out of the erratic behavior of the leader of the world’s largest economy. Making sense out of what the world’s second-largest economy will do will only be slightly easier. A few speakers at our office might be able to help you out.

China’s economy is strangled by itself, not the trade war – Harry Broadman

Trade talks between Beijing and Washington are on its way, but the trade war is not China’s real problems, says economic analyst Harry Broadman. China’s economy is strangling itself, he writes in the Financial Times.

US politicians find common ground: restrict foreign investments – Harry Broadman

The American political landscape might be more divided than ever before, political analyst Harry Broadman sees one field where Republicans and Democrats find common ground: restricting foreign investments, especially but not only those from China through the Committee on Foreign Investment in the US (CFIUS), he writes in Gulf News.

How the Trump team is missing the point on China – Harry Broadman

The world, including China, is still trying to make sense out of the Trump/Xi trade talks. The Trump trade team is fighting the wrong battle, argues former U.S. Assistant Trade Representative Harry Broadman for Gulf News. “The Trump trade team continues to fight the wrong battle with China.”

The Belt and Road initiative: all roads lead to China (updated)

One of the major global initiatives by China was the massive Belt and Road Initiative, reviving the old silk roads. In May 2017 a major international conference showed what our experts were already expecting: now all roads lead to China. Even countries who suffered from difficult relations with China, including both Koreas, appeared in Beijing.Larger than the former Marshall Plan after the Second World War, OBOR is going to redefine global trade.

NAFTA’s 2.0 China poison pill will not work – Harry Broadman

Former NAFTA negotiator Harry Broadman predicts in Forbes the new trade agreement between the US, Canada and Mexico might not work in the way president Donald Trump wants it to.

How emerging markets turn around the product lifecycle – Harry Broadman

Emerging markets have turned around the traditional view on the product lifecycle, as multinational knew them, argues Harry Broadman in his speech on innovation and entrepreneurship. No longer is the US the birth ground of new ideas, who then spread to emerging economy, but innovation from emerging countries conquer the world in its own right.

Wrong wishful thinking: the US is winning the trade war – Harry Broadman

US media tend to frame their stories by dividing the world into winners and losers. In the US-China trade war they have declared the US the winner, for all the wrong reasons, writes political analyst Harry Broadman in Forbes. In this case, the media framing is creating a dangerous and wrong myth, he writes.

The dangers of Trump’s divisive economic policies – Harry Broadman

Making sense out of US president Donald Trump’s economic policies has become impossible, even for the most seasoned observers, like Harry Broadman. For Forbes he tries to make sense out of the damage Trump has caused up to now, and the decades it will cost to repair that damage.