Tag Archives: Arthur Kroeber

China’s carefully measured response to Trump’s trade war – Arthur Kroeber

Unlike the bully-like approach of Donald Trump, China has sent a carefully calibrated messages, trying to avoid a devastating trade war, says renowned economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the South China Morning Post and the Washington Post. China has more cards up its sleeves, he suggests.

Liu He: supporter of Xi’s state-driven economic agenda – Arthur Kroeber

The appointment of Liu He as president Xi Jinping’s economic top man has started speculations on his political direction, including a restart of reforms. We should not expect Liu to divert too much from the state-driven economic agenda Xi has already set out in the past few years, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the New York Times.

The real story behind the US trade war against China – Arthur Kroeber

The world was once again flabbergasted by the US trade measures since it did hurt designated trade enemy China less than potential US allies again China, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®. Behind those measures are efforts to design a whole new playbook, to change global economy, he tells both Livemint and Bloomberg.

US does not want more market, but contain China – Arthur Kroeber

The disruption caused by trade tensions is not going to give the US more market share for American companies, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to Bloomberg. And that is not what the US wants: “The USTR is not trying to bargain with Beijing: it is trying to force a deep change in behavior.”

Why China can afford to stay cool under Trump’s trade war threats – Arthur Kroeber

China has reacted pretty cool on the increased signals US president Donal Trump is heading for a trade war, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the Washington Post. While the traditional conflict-solving procedures at the WTO might not fit the tit-for-tat approach of a trade war, China can afford to keep its composure.

What is the purpose of US’ trade actions? – Arthur Kroeber

Most observers of the recent trade actions by the US have been left behind flabbergasted, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to CNN. While the rhetoric is firmly anti-Chinese, most damage is done to other countries than China. Although that could change, he adds.

Xi’s move: good news for investors – Arthur Kroeber

President Xi Jinping is likely to extend his tenure beyond two terms, by changing the constitution. That is basically good news for investors, tells the economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to Bloomberg. Although in the long run, there might be some caveats.

Old trade warrior Robert Lighthizer leads the US fight against China – Arthur Kroeber

May last year Robert Lighthizer was sworn in as US trade representative. He is the key person to watch when a trade war between China and the US is developing, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, in the South China Morning Post.

Economic optimism for China’s 2018 – Arthur Kroeber

Economists seldom all agree when it comes to China’s economic future, but there is a widespread optimism about the expected country’s performance for 2018, tells leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, to the South China Morning Post.

How China’s doomsayers failed for two decades – Arthur Kroeber

Renowned China expert Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, uses the final edition of the China Economic Quarterly (CEQ) to rub it in. Many journalists and other analysts made a living predicting China’s demise over the past two decades. Kroeber explains why those predictions failed, and not China itself, in the South China Morning Post.