Tag Archives: Arthur Kroeber

Digitization of China’s manufacturing – Arthur Kroeber

China has been leapfrogging into the digitization of the consumer industry but is now moving into the established manufacturing too. Economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to…

China’s carefully measured response to Trump’s trade war – Arthur Kroeber

Unlike the bully-like approach of Donald Trump, China has sent a carefully calibrated messages, trying to avoid a devastating trade war, says renowned economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the South China Morning Post and the Washington Post. China has more cards up its sleeves, he suggests.

Liu He: supporter of Xi’s state-driven economic agenda – Arthur Kroeber

The appointment of Liu He as president Xi Jinping’s economic top man has started speculations on his political direction, including a restart of reforms. We should not expect Liu to divert too much from the state-driven economic agenda Xi has already set out in the past few years, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the New York Times.

The real story behind the US trade war against China – Arthur Kroeber

The world was once again flabbergasted by the US trade measures since it did hurt designated trade enemy China less than potential US allies again China, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®. Behind those measures are efforts to design a whole new playbook, to change global economy, he tells both Livemint and Bloomberg.

US does not want more market, but contain China – Arthur Kroeber

The disruption caused by trade tensions is not going to give the US more market share for American companies, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to Bloomberg. And that is not what the US wants: “The USTR is not trying to bargain with Beijing: it is trying to force a deep change in behavior.”

Why China can afford to stay cool under Trump’s trade war threats – Arthur Kroeber

China has reacted pretty cool on the increased signals US president Donal Trump is heading for a trade war, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the Washington Post. While the traditional conflict-solving procedures at the WTO might not fit the tit-for-tat approach of a trade war, China can afford to keep its composure.

What is the purpose of US’ trade actions? – Arthur Kroeber

Most observers of the recent trade actions by the US have been left behind flabbergasted, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to CNN. While the rhetoric is firmly anti-Chinese, most damage is done to other countries than China. Although that could change, he adds.

Xi’s move: good news for investors – Arthur Kroeber

President Xi Jinping is likely to extend his tenure beyond two terms, by changing the constitution. That is basically good news for investors, tells the economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to Bloomberg. Although in the long run, there might be some caveats.

Strategy experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Making sense out of China has always been challenging, although the questions companies and people have to ask themselves change permanently. From a rather uregulated booming economy, now dealing we a tsunami of new rules, anti-corruption and a – relatively – slowing economy changes the strategic questions you have to deal with And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China´s strategic challenges. We have a selection here (but you can always ask for more).

Financial experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Now a massive row of Chinese companies, including Alibaba, are preparing for IPO´s, both at home at abroad, insights in China´s financial industry are more important than ever,

The government wants to allow market forces to decide what financial direction the country is taking, and because more than even capital is owned by Chinese citizens, just looking at what the central government in Beijing is doing, is not longer good enough.