Latest Articles

The risks and benefits of One Belt, One Road – Sara Hsu

China’s massive One-Belt, One-Road program has often been compared with the US Marshal plan after the Second World War. Keen to reap the benefits, risks have also been highlighted, writes financial analyst Sara Hsu at Capital Watch. US investors like Marc Merlino, head of Citi’s global subsidiaries group started to explore the field, she writes.

At last: opening the China markets for IPO’s – Shaun Rein

Many successful Chinese companies listed in the US, rather than in China, because of the stringent regulations in their own country. Now going IPO in China is at least becoming easier, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to Harbour Times. And some Chinese companies might come back from the US.

Social currency in an online society – Tom Doctoroff

China’s deep Confucian roots do influence the way the internet has developed, says marketing veteran Tom Doctoroff, author of What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism, and China’s Modern Consumer, to the South Morning Post. “I call it pride commerce, where there is the idea that you are what you buy … and that sharing your interests is a way to make your identity stronger,” Doctoroff said.

US and China lock horns on tech – Arthur Kroeber

The trade dispute between the US and China is moving from commodities to tech, says economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the South China Morning Post. Getting a deal will be tough, says Kroeber: “The problem from China’s perspective is: can you trust the US to stick to any deal you cut with them?”

How ‘social’ became crucial for internet business in China – Shaun Rein

Social connectivity has become crucial for life and business in China. “If you want to do well as an internet company today, you need to be strong on the social aspect, otherwise you won’t be able to gain any traction,” tells business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to the South China Morning Post.

In China’s working culture, time’s are changing – William Bao Bean

For a long time, working around the clock – from 9 to 9, six days a week known as the 996-rule – was common in China’s startup working culture. But those times are changing, says SOSV managing director William Bao Bean, a leading voice in China’s startup scene to the BBC. “China has moved from a society that was told what to do, to one that is doing what it wants to, and that’s also a millennial thing,” he says.

The 2008 Sichuan earthquake is still sending aftershocks – Ian Johnson

The devastating 2008 Sichuan earthquake is still sending tremors into China’s society, writes journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, in the NY Review of Books.”China’s supreme rulers today also have a strong hold over their citizens, but their edifice might not be immune from seismic change in society.”

What does China want? – Shaun Rein

China is adamant when it says it does not want to replace the United States as an international player. But what does it want, asks The Diplomat Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. ” Many nations feel Western, historically ethnically white nations have an outsized say in institutions like the World Bank or IMF and feel the U.S. contains their growth.”

How brands can overcome political problems – Tom Doctoroff

Cartoon Peppa Pig was the latest to get into China’s political crosshairs, but it was not the first and will not be the last, says branding expert Tom Doctoroff. For Mumbrella Asia he gives a quick overview of those problems, and some tips to avoid them, and limit the damage when you get caught.

Chinese spinoffs: a different story – Paul Gillis

Spinoffs are typically business transactions where the total of all entities increase their value by splitting up their existing business. But not so for Chinese companies, listed in the US, argues Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis. Not the shareholders or the company gains, but mostly management, he explains at his weblog.

Google+