Latest Articles

How the Vatican changed its position to China – Ian Johnson

The Roman Catholic Church at the Vatican has shocked its communities in China by asking two “underground” bishops by complying to the country’s rulers. Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, tries to make sense out of the move for the New York Times.

Why BuzzFeed is likely to fail in China – Shaun Rein

News aggregator Jinri Toutiao agrees to distribute content from American media outlet BuzzFeed to a Chinese audience, the Sixth Tone reports. After failures to start media operations in China by Rupert Murdoch, Google, Yahoo, Facebook, Time Warner and Viacom – to mention a few – you can see business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order shaking his head in disbelieve, as he comments on the move.

The self-driving car: the next disruptive tool – Mark Schaub

No tool has changed life in China more than the smartphone, with 640 million users and counting in less than a decade. But a new device is possibly disrupting – and improving – life even more, writes Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub in the China Law Insight: the self-driving car. He paints the upcoming changes, and the way China’s government is promoting that change.

How to deal with China as a partner – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order defines three different relations China can have with other countries: hot, warm or cold partners. From Cambodia he reports how a hot partner like Cambodia can deal with its powerful neighbor, according to the Phnom Penh Post. 

Religion: a way to restore some order in China – Ian Johnson

The less-than straightforward relation between China’s communist rulers and religion is one of the complicated concepts author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao tries to explain. From repression, to tolerance and now moving to a idea to use religion to restore some order, that relationship has changed profoundly, he tells The Politic, although it varies depending on what religion you look at.

Rich more optimistic about China’s future – Rupert Hoogewerf

China’s high-net-worth individuals are more optimistic about the country’s economic development compared to last yet, says the Hurun Chinese Luxury Consumers Survey 2018, released on Wednesday, according to the China Daily. Rupert Hoogewerf, founder and chief researcher of Hurun, said that although China’s GDP growth rate was 6.9 percent last year, which is slightly up from the 6.5 percent estimated by the central government at the beginning of 2017, it is enough to make a difference.

Why AI works better on WeChat than on Facebook – William Bao Bean

Chinese companies are making great strides in using machine learning or AI. One of the reasons is that  China’s WeChat is better fit than Facebook to integrate this disruptive tool, says William Bao Bean, director or the  Chinaccelerator to eMarketer about influencer marketing in China.

Time for a new approach of North Korea – Harry Broadman

North and South Korea have started talks, potentially defusing the tension in the region. Time for a new and more positive approach of China’s unruly neighbor, says Harry Broadman, former PwC Emerging Markets Investment Leader; in Gulf News. For example by nurturing the country’s private sector. It might be coming as a surprise for many, but North Korea does have a private sector, Broadman writes.

Our left-behind children – Zhang Lijia

Millions of migrant workers left behind their children in their home villages, developing mostly unheard problems. Author Zhang Lijia, who earlier published Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China, is now working on a book on this hidden drama, including epidemic suicide, and she started publishing their stories in the South China Morning Post.

Facebook needs China, but China does not need Facebook – Ben Cavender

Facebook’s bumpy relationship with China got another hit as the companies lead manager, Wang-Li Moser, in charge of government relations, decided last week to return to the US for “personal reasons”. Business analyst Ben Cavender explains why China does not really need Facebook, in the Wall Street Journal.

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