Category Archives: technology

The race for technical leadership – Arthur Kroeber

The trade war, triggered off by US president Donald Trump, is about much more than trading commodities. The real struggle is about technical leadership between China and the US, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the Los Angeles Times.

Running an international operation from Shanghai – William Bao Bean

William Bao Bean, managing director of the Shanghai-based Chinaccelarator, tells about his busy week, trying to help foreign startups to enter China and helping Chinese companies to go global. The main problem of his international operation? “You never have a holiday.”

Foreign car makers cannot ignore China’s self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

China is leading the market of self-driving cars, because its size and the aggressive way the government is paving the road, literally, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub to the China Law Insight. But investing in China offers not only huge opportunities, the challenges are equally gargantuan. 

The 2018 Tencent Report – Matthew Brennan

Tencent is one of the world’s largest and most influential IT companies, but very few know what the company looks like. WeChat expert Matthew Brennan made for China Channel the Tencent Report, a short introduction to the company.

Why AI works better on WeChat than on Facebook – William Bao Bean

Chinese companies are making great strides in using machine learning or AI. One of the reasons is that  China’s WeChat is better fit than Facebook to integrate this disruptive tool, says William Bao Bean, director or the  Chinaccelerator to eMarketer about influencer marketing in China.

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi top 2017 best Chinese unicorns – Rupert Hoogewerf

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi made it to the top-3 Chinese unicorns in 2017 on a list of 120 most successful unicorns in Greater China, announced the Hurun Greater China Unicorn 2017 Index last week. Beijing is leading the pack, says Hurun founder Rupert Hoogewerf, followed by Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Hangzhou. Keeping up with the amazing growth is tough, Hoogewerf tells AsiaVenturepedia.

What do Chinese companies do different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.

Bike-sharing: only at the start of their development – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing companies in China had a rough year, combining huge investments and limited returns. Smaller ones went bankrupt and market leaders Mobike and Ofo are rumored to discuss a merger. Peking University investment professor Jeffrey Towson still see enough room for success, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Will bike-share firms merge? Not yet – Jeffrey Towson

Will Mobike and Ofo, China’s largest bike-sharing companies merge, like car-sharing firm did in the past? Not yet, says Peking University professor Jeffrey Towson. International expansions goes well, capital is freely available, and a crippling price war has not yet emerged, he argues.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.