Category Archives: Stock market

How China’s stock markets are different – Ann Rutledge

China’s is officially heading for more reforms of its financial markets. But their stock markets are still a very different creature compared to the stock markets elsewhere, says financial analyst Ann Rutledge in Knowledge@Wharton.

Internet giants changed into investment vehicles – Shaun Rein

Internet giants Baidu, Tencent and Alibaba increasingly buy into innovative companies to stay ahead of the competition. They have become dominant investment vehicles, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to the South China Morning Post.

At last: opening the China markets for IPO’s – Shaun Rein

Many successful Chinese companies listed in the US, rather than in China, because of the stringent regulations in their own country. Now going IPO in China is at least becoming easier, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order┬áto┬áHarbour Times. And some Chinese companies might come back from the US.

Chinese spinoffs: a different story – Paul Gillis

Spinoffs are typically business transactions where the total of all entities increase their value by splitting up their existing business. But not so for Chinese companies, listed in the US, argues Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis. Not the shareholders or the company gains, but mostly management, he explains at his weblog.

How KPMG Hong Kong got itself into serious problems – Paul Gillis

Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis describes on his weblog how auditor KPMG Hong Kong got itself into trouble for signing off papers on China Medical, a company convicted in 2012 for looting US$400 million from its investors. Problem: KPMG Hong Kong was not really in charge and now the Hong Kong legal system caught up with this omission.

HK audit regulations go downhill to attract US business – Paul Gillis

Many Chinese companies took a listing at US exchanges because audits in Hong Kong and on mainland exchanges were stricter. The HK stock market now is watering down regulations for audits, notes Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis on his website to his shock, to pull back those Chinese companies from the US.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.

IPO-hungry tech firms might jump the queue in China – Paul Gillis

Financial authorities in Beijing are playing with the idea to give tech firms a faster-track IPO in China, says accounting professor Paul Gillis at his weblog. Taking away some of the cumbersome restrictions for IPO’s in China might lead to the expected ban of variable interest entity or VIE’s, a side-track allowing Chinese firms to list in the US, he suggests.

How to end double standards for US-listed Chinese companies – Paul Gillis

Oversight of Chinese companies listed in the US has been ongoing troublesome, as auditors miss access to much information considered a state-secret in China. Peking University accounting professor Paul Gillis told the U.S.-China Security and Economic Commission 26 January how to solve the conundrum

Chinese bid for Chicago exchange bumps into roadblocks – Shaun Rein

A Chinese bid for the Chicago Stock Exchange is running into major roadblocks, both in China and the US. The bidder the private Chinese company Chongqing Casin Enterprise Group might have waited too long, says business analyst Shaun Rein in the South China Morning Post. Both in China and the US barriers seem too high to close the deal.