Category Archives: politics

In China, politics is crucial for business – Shaun Rein

China has become a politicized society, and countries and businesses can only ignore politics at their own peril. That is one of the key messages of political analyst Shaun Rein’s book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, and at the China Economic Review, he explains how that – in his view – works.

Political experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Under president Xi Jinping, politics has become more dynamic than under his predecessor Hu Jintao. Anti-corruption, political reforms and increased infighting between different factions mark the news on an almost daily basis. And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China´s political development.

“Trade war” is actually business-as-usual between US and China – Kaiser Kuo

The US bans Huawei and solar panels. China ‘investigates’ sorghum. Is a trade war developing between China and the US? Not so fast, says political analyst Kaiser Kuo, and former communication director for Baidu, at Wired. What we see according to him is just business as usual.

What about cybersecurity for self-driving cars? – Mark Schaub

China is diving fast into self-driving cars. But while cybersecurity has become a major issue in IT, in the combination of self-driving cars, cybersecurity is not getting the attention it deserves, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub on the China Law Insight, focusing on the legal risks and the actions the Chinese government did take.

Location is key, also for economists – Shaun Rein

Chinese New Year is ahead and economists have their predictions about the country’s economy ready. Much of their gloomy prospects (Over-investment, too much debt, bubbly markets, faked data, Ponzi-like financial structures) depends on their location, observes business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, according to Bloomberg. Those located in China tend to get the uptick in the economy better than those observing China from afar.

Mao killed more than Stalin or Hitler – Ian Johnson

Who killed more, Hitler or Stalin, is a question often asked. Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, argues – 60 years after the Great Leap Forward started – that Mao Zedong is often wrongly excluded from this debate. But he opts for a nuanced approach in The New York Review of Books, although in numbers Mao beats both Stalin and Hitler.

Old trade warrior Robert Lighthizer leads the US fight against China – Arthur Kroeber

May last year Robert Lighthizer was sworn in as US trade representative. He is the key person to watch when a trade war between China and the US is developing, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, in the South China Morning Post.

How to deal with China as a partner – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order defines three different relations China can have with other countries: hot, warm or cold partners. From Cambodia he reports how a hot partner like Cambodia can deal with its powerful neighbor, according to the Phnom Penh Post. 

Time for a new approach of North Korea – Harry Broadman

North and South Korea have started talks, potentially defusing the tension in the region. Time for a new and more positive approach of China’s unruly neighbor, says Harry Broadman, former PwC Emerging Markets Investment Leader; in Gulf News. For example by nurturing the country’s private sector. It might be coming as a surprise for many, but North Korea does have a private sector, Broadman writes.

Facebook needs China, but China does not need Facebook – Ben Cavender

Facebook’s bumpy relationship with China got another hit as the companies lead manager, Wang-Li Moser, in charge of government relations, decided last week to return to the US for “personal reasons”. Business analyst Ben Cavender explains why China does not really need Facebook, in the Wall Street Journal.