Category Archives: middle class

Consumption experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

The Chinese government tries to shift its economy from investment-driven towards consumption, with considerable success. And the outside world is equally seeing the consumption power of the Chinese, as they travel more than ever, and spend per head more than tourists from any other country.

But tapping into that huge spending power is not always easy, and is driven by the often hard-to-predict habits of Chinese consumers, policies by the government and the powerful social media. Experts at the China Speakers Bureau are happy to give your efforts direction.

Can Luckin beat Starbucks? – Ben Cavender

Competition is a key feature in China’s industries, but coffee retailer Starbucks never faced those challenges. Now Luckin emerges, and Starbucks has no longer a free ride, tells business analyst Ben Cavender to the New York Times.

How lagging China became a frontrunner in mobile payments – Ben Cavender

Cash was king, not so long ago in China. But as wealth and the middle class increased, mobile payments had an advantage, says business analyst Ben Cavender. Because other payment tools like cards did not have a solid footprint, eager smartphone users adopted mobile payments quickly, he tells That’s Magazine. But: “Realistically, I don’t think cash will go away entirely, but it will certainly be relegated to a less important role.”

How state and religion are intertwined in China – Ian Johnson

In China power and religion are intertwined, argues journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao and you cannot understand China without knowing its religion. At the UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy, he explains how religion moved from apparently irrelevant to crucial in today’s China. Why religion is not going away, as many intellectuals have thought.

The future of China’s millennials – Tom Doctoroff

A new generation is emerging to set their mark on China. Marketing veteran Tom Doctoroff looks at the relative newcomers, and how they differ from past generations, for state-owned TV station CGTN. “Post-90s are proudly patriotic, they want to see a strong China,” he says.

Why China is importing rice from the US – Sara Hsu

Self-sufficiency in food has long been the mantra of China. But that is changing, as the country even imports rice from the US. Aging farmers, pollution and other challenges makes this change necessary, tells assistant professor Sara Shu, as the domestic production cannot be guaranteed.

The disrupting power of China’s consumers – Jeffrey Towson

China’s consumers are becoming increasingly a force the rest of the world has to take into account, writes Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson at his weblog. Not only have Chinese more disposable income, they not only go for cheap offers, and regularly disrupt the world.

China’s search for happiness – Ian Johnson

Most of China has left poverty behind, but people are still not happy. The search for moral values is now taking over the desire among China’s citizens, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in PRI. How turning to religion can change the country.

How young consumers have become different – Jeffrey Towson

The first wave of Chinese consumers has always been hard to get: prudent, and worried about their future. Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson describes at his weblog how the millennials have become an altogether different breed of consumers. On brand loyalty, emotion and confidence.

Illegal churches: large, and condoned by the government – Ian Johnson

Not registered gatherings of religious believers have been a major force in the growing search for religion in China, but – says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the Atlantic – they have largely been condoned by the government, and Johnson does not believe that might change.