Category Archives: luxury

China consumers have become more sophisticated in dealing with brands – Tom Doctoroff

Consumers in China have become more sophisticated over the years in the way they handle brands, says China veteran Tom Doctoroff, Chief Cultural Office or Prophet and author of the bestseller What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism, and China’s Modern Consumer, at the occasion of the 2018 Prophet China Brand Relevance Index(TM) at the Market Business Inside.

Prices luxury goods in China rise – Rupert Hoogewerf

The luxury consumer price index (CPI) went up 4.1% in the first five months of 2018, the highest rise since 2012, says Rupert Hoogewerf, chairman and chief researcher of the Hurun Report, according to the Global Times. 

Less bling, more consumption in China – Tom Doctoroff

Marketing guru Tom Doctoroff denies stories about a downgrade of consumption in China, as some assume. There is less bling in the bigger cities, but the rest of the country sees more consumption as people just get enough income to start consumers, he tells at CGTN.

Challenges at China’s markets for foreign brands – Ashley Dudarenok

The China market is of a magnitude brands cannot ignore, although some of the foreign brands still take this major consumer market not serious, says China veteran and marketing expert Ashley Dudarenok to Euromonitor. “It’s mostly European and American brands that have organizational challenges,” she adds.

Marketing experts at the China Speakers Bureau

Selling your products to Chinese consumers has not become easier over the years, even now a larger part of them has more to spend. Fierce competition, limited access to the internet, strict government regulations and very different consumer taste are just a few of the barriers for foreign companies to succeed in China.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we can offer you a range of experts able to help you take those barriers. Are you interested in having one of them? Do get in touch, so we can help you to identify the right expert for dealing with your problem.

Why mobile commerce does not equal e-commerce – Ashley Dudarenok

Selling online in China needs a completely different approach compared to the rest of the world. Marketing veteran Ashley Dudarenok, author of Unlocking the World’s Largest E-Market: A Guide to Selling on Chinese Social Media explains to CER what the difference is between e-commerce and mobile commerce, and why mobile is dominant in China.

Ashley Dudarenok joins the China Speakers Bureau

The China Speakers Bureau is happy to announce that Hong Kong-based marketing veteran Ashley Dudarenok is joining her speakers’ agency. Ashley not only has 12 years of business and marketing experience in China, and is an expert on social media but also using those tools in a very creative way.

How WeChat Pay took off with digital red envelopes – Matthew Brennan

When Tencent started during the 2014 CCTV New Year show to promote giving red envelopes online, few realized it was the successful kick-off what is now known as WeChat Pay, says WeChat expert Matthew Brennan to the JingDaily. Some luxury brands did not like the concept though: “The idea of a discount communicates value and is generally not an incentive that luxury brands want to be associated with.”

How to brand your message in China – Tom Doctoroff

Stability and tradition in China are much stronger over the generations than many outsiders assume, marketing guru Tom Doctoroff, author of What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism, and China’s Modern Consumer, argues in this video clip for Amcham. Tensions between generations do exist in China too, but they are different from those elsewhere in the world, he argues.

Rich more optimistic about China’s future – Rupert Hoogewerf

China’s high-net-worth individuals are more optimistic about the country’s economic development compared to last yet, says the Hurun Chinese Luxury Consumers Survey 2018, released on Wednesday, according to the China Daily. Rupert Hoogewerf, founder and chief researcher of Hurun, said that although China’s GDP growth rate was 6.9 percent last year, which is slightly up from the 6.5 percent estimated by the central government at the beginning of 2017, it is enough to make a difference.