Category Archives: globalization

“Trade war” is actually business-as-usual between US and China – Kaiser Kuo

The US bans Huawei and solar panels. China ‘investigates’ sorghum. Is a trade war developing between China and the US? Not so fast, says political analyst Kaiser Kuo, and former communication director for Baidu, at Wired. What we see according to him is just business as usual.

Cross-border e-commerce: tough to realize opportunities – Andy Mok

Cross-border e-commerce offers huge opportunities, not only for China but for SME’s globally. Realizing those opportunities will not happen by itself, but needs huge efforts, says business consultant Andy Mok in a commentary for state-broadcaster CGTN.

One-Belt, One-Road: all roads lead to China

One of the major global initiatives by China was the One-Belt, One-Road (OBOR),reviving the old silk roads. And while it is an open platform, major trade partners of China are currently not part of the initiative, including Australia, the UK and the US. Major disputes, like the Ausgrid, Brexit and Hickley cases, might only add to the worries countries should have when looking at their relation with China, without being part of OBOR.

How to deal with China as a partner – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order defines three different relations China can have with other countries: hot, warm or cold partners. From Cambodia he reports how a hot partner like Cambodia can deal with its powerful neighbor, according to the Phnom Penh Post. 

China “New Belt’ program ready for renovation – Harry Broadman

When China’s president Xi Jinping baptized his edition of the former silk road, he called it “One Belt, One Road”. That idea and its name went against the idea of the old silk road, which was an organic set of trade routes, says Harry Broadman, former PwC Emerging Markets Investment Leader, in the Gulf News. The centralized approach by Beijing does not appeal to all stakeholders, he says.

Why the Chinese censor might not like my book – Shaun Rein

How to make money in China, and how the country works as a powerbroker are the key subjects of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order by author Shaun Rein. For NPR he tells what companies are doing well, but also why the Chinese censor might ban his book, as they did with previous ones.

Why the World Internet Conference mattered – William Bao Bean

The World Internet Conference in Wuzhen has long been derived as part of China’s propaganda tool. But those days are over, writes William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelerator, who attended the conference last month, together with IT leaders from the US and China, he writes in Medium. “It is going to be a wild ride.”

Management skills needed for China’s outbound investments – Shaun Rein

One of the key barriers in China’s massive outbound investment programs, like One Belt, One Road (OBOR) is the lack of management talents, tells author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order on the Human Resources page at LinkedIn. “Private Chinese companies have the capital and will pay for consulting services, especially companies in the tech sector.”

“The War for China’s Wallets” now available – Shaun Rein

Shaun Rein’s long-awaited new book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order is now available at Amazon and possible a bookstore near you. “This book covers more geopolitics than my previous two books and looks at how China is cementing its power through economic carrots/ initiatives like One Belt One Road and by punishing countries like Norway and companies like Lotte that do not follow its wants politically. The book looks at how China is dealing with Southeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula, the Middle East, and how the US needs to respond,” he writes at the publisher’s website. 

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.