Category Archives: culture

Baidu is not ruled by the communist party – Kaiser Kuo

Foreign journalists visiting the headquarters of Baidu in Beijing, China’s largest search engine, might be up for a surprise, as they are met by rock musician Kaiser Kuo, also spokesperson of Google’s competitor. Here is a part of the report by Jordan Pouille in Metro.

The essence of trans-Atlantic conversation – Tricia Wang

Tricia Wang reviews a review of her work by Anxiao Mina for the Huffington Post and reflects on the essence of trans-Atlantic conversation. China’s internet cafes and Western saloons.

How to earn respect in China – Janet Carmosky

Getting respect in China is tough for any business executive, writes Janet Carmosky in Forbes. Defining criteria: Chinese have to define you as smart, but most foreign expats have no clue how to gain that.

About not writing a book about China – Janet Carmosky

It took Janet Carmosky thirty years not to write a book about what she knows about China, she tells in Forbes, and hopes Former US Treasury Secretary and Goldman Sachs CEO Hank Paulson will take at least that much time before he finishes his announced book on China.

Why Weibo is cuter than Twitter – Tricia Wang

All too often Sina’s microblog service Weibo is described as a kloon of Twitter. Sociologist Tricia Wang in Wuhan has been using Weibo for a few months and starts to report on her weblog about the differences of the two. About fun, love and entertainment.

On headbangers and metal in China – Kaiser Kuo

In a short documentary rock musician Kaiser Kuo recalls the emergence of headbangers and metal in China, and the famous band Tang Dynasty. You can read his story also in our book: A Changing China.

Cavender, Ben

Ben Cavender is a senior analyst with The China Market Research Group (CMR) focusing on strategic planning and brand positioning. He graduated from Cornell University with a BA in Government and Asian Studies. He travels from Shanghai.

Mark Obama Ndesandjo

Building bridges between China and the US has become his passion, ever since Mark Obama Ndesandjo lost his job after 9/11 and found a new homeland in China. As an accomplished business man, he decided that there is more into life than making money. He started to teach piano at orphanages and has been heavily involved in charity events in China. He travels from Shenzhen.