Category Archives: culture

How China’s urbanites create new identities – Ian Johnson

China’s big cities are developing a new city life, including new identities, writes journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, at the opening chapter of, Shanghai Sacred: The Religious Landscape of a Global City, by photographer and anthropologist Liz Hingley, quoted in a review of the photo exhibition in Liverpool at Creative Boom

The abyss between Hong Kong and mainland people – Zhang Lijia

Western media too easily assume the protests in Hong Kong are supported by many mainland Chinese. Wrong, says author Zhang Lijia. There is a wide dived between mainland Chinese and Hongkongnese, and that is not only because of the media censorship in the mainland, she adds at the South China Morning Post.

First Rome-approved bishop good news for Vatican – Ian Johnson

The first ordination of a bishop, Father Yao Shun, approved by the Pope and the central government is good news for the Vatican, says journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, to AFP. 

Ian Johnson no.1 in 2019 Best In-Depth Newswriting on Religion Contest

Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, has won the 2019 Best In-Depth Newswriting on Religion Contest, says the website of the American Academy of Religion (AAR). 

A realistic view on Tibetan Buddhism – Ian Johnson

Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao reviews a show at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City on Tibetan Buddhism for the NY Review of Books, a must read even when you do not make it to New York. Ian Johnson adds on Facebook: “Probably no faith is more stereotyped than Tibetan Buddhism, which has morphed in the West to a sort of feel-good faith led by a nice guy with a Nobel Peace Prize.”

Long work hours do not work in China anymore – Shaun Rein

Tech companies in China became big by asking their workers to make long hours, 996 in jargon. But those days are over says business analyst Shaun Rein to CBS. Not only is it illegal to let people work those long hours, but qualified workers also leave their jobs, because they want to have a life next to their work too.

Western marketeers fail to connect with China consumers – Ashley Dudarenok

Western marketers rely on stereotypes of the Chinese consumers, rather than connecting with them, says China marketeer Ashley Dudarenok in the Holmes Report. “the relatively sudden rise of the Chinese consumer, has given rise to a number of stereotypes,” she adds.

Modern China faces new feudal attitudes towards women – Zhang Lijia

Morality classes are popping up all over the country, teaching past traditional attitudes towards women, warns author Zhang Lijia in an opinion piece in The South China Morning Post who signals a backlash towards banned feudal behavior. The government steps in when those excesses are discovered, but it remains unclear what stays under the radar, Zhang adds.

Why facial recognition meets less resistance in China – Matthew Brennan

Facial recognition and the exchange of related data seems to meet little resistance in China, compared to Western consumers. Tencent observer Matthew Brennan sees some rubbles among the public, but indeed no big scale anxiety on facial recognition, he tells in Slate and dives into the different perceptions.

Dilemmas of animal-testing for China cosmetics – Mark Schaub

Globally cosmetic companies have been phasing out animal testing, but in China authorities sometimes still require those tests. Lawyer  Mark Schaub looks at the dilemmas for international cosmetics, who face different requirements, and potential damage to their brand, at the China Law Insight.