Category Archives: civil society

Why “House of Cards” got a massive following in China – Tom Doctoroff

“House of Cards” might be a cynical parody on US politics, millions of Chinese also enjoyed the Netflix production and hade it a huge impact in China. Cultural expert and China expert Tom Doctoroff, author of What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism, and China’s Modern Consumer, explains to the Washington Post why. “It essentially confirmed that our government is not so different than theirs.”

How long format videos become popular in China – Ashley Dudarenok

Short entertaining videos of 15-30 seconds were hot in China a few years ago, says vlogger and marketeer Ashley Dudarenok on her vlog, but the internet population is moving to a long format, that is three minutes. Viewers really want to be part of your life, she says.

Why women are high on China’s rich list – Rupert Hoogewerf

Women might be scarce at China’s political platforms, but on the China rich list, they are doing very well, says Hurun China Rich List publisher Rupert Hoogewerf tells the China Daily. “China accounts for 60 percent of the world’s most successful female entrepreneurs, while Chinese women make up one-fifth of the world’s female population,” he says.

Divided Catholics face Beijing-Vatican deal – Ian Johnson

China’s central government and the Vatican closed a deal on appointments of Catholic bishops in China, causing debate among the already divided Catholics in the country, writes journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao at the New York Times. The way the Communist-ruled state church might integrate with the Roman Catholic church might not please all Catholics, he writes.

Luxury as display of success in China – Tom Doctoroff

Luxury, as a display of success, is a key element in China, among all different cohorts, says marketing veteran Tom Doctoroff, author of What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism, and China’s Modern Consumer to Emarketer. What they have in common is a Confucian culture, binding all Chinese together, he says. If explains the longing for luxury.

How #MeToo brought down China’s supermonk – Ian Johnson

The Venerable Xuecheng did become the symbol for supercharged Buddhism in China. Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, looks for the New York Times at how China’s #MeToo movement brought down this confusing factor in the rising Buddhism.

How Jack Ma changed China – William Bao Bean

Traditionally China’s youngsters wanted a job with the government, but Alibaba’s Jack Ma changed that perspective and starting a startup became the choice of many, says William Bao Bean, a Shanghai-based partner at venture capital firm SOS, one of the largest VC’s, to Bloomberg. How Jack Ma changed China.

How religion links to China’s outbound investments – Ian Johnson

Religion in China is on the rise, shows journalist Ian Johnson in his book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao. China’s outbound investments in the One Road, One Belt (OBOR) or Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) program illustrate that change in China’s approach to religion, he says to Indepthnews.net

Google will have a hard time in China – Shaun Rein

Google needs a strategy to enter China if it wants another one billion users, but that is not going to be easy, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order in the Hindustan Times. Especially since China’s search engine Baidu is way better in speaking Chinese.

The high potential of Steinway – Shaun Rein

Playing the violin or the piano belongs to the aspiration of many Chinese kids, or at least their parents. The intended purchase of Steinweg by state-owned Poly has high potential, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to Bloomberg.