Category Archives: books

Trade war will lead to higher consumer prices – Victor Shih

Tariffs in the ongoing trade war are taxes, so it is unavoidable consumer prices will go up, says financial analyst Victor Shih, author of Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation, at The Point. Some increases might be taken by the distributors, and consumers are not yet worried because the US economy is now doing very well, Shih says. But that could change in the months to come when the effects of the trade war kick in.

Divided Catholics face Beijing-Vatican deal – Ian Johnson

China’s central government and the Vatican closed a deal on appointments of Catholic bishops in China, causing debate among the already divided Catholics in the country, writes journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao at the New York Times. The way the Communist-ruled state church might integrate with the Roman Catholic church might not please all Catholics, he writes.

Luxury as display of success in China – Tom Doctoroff

Luxury, as a display of success, is a key element in China, among all different cohorts, says marketing veteran Tom Doctoroff, author of What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism, and China’s Modern Consumer to Emarketer. What they have in common is a Confucian culture, binding all Chinese together, he says. If explains the longing for luxury.

The trouble of being a celebrity in China – Shaun Rein

The disappearance of famous movie star Fan Bingbing now three months ago has kept many guessing for the reasons behind it. Being a celebrity in China has some extra risks, explains business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, for AP.  “There’s a greater risk for celebrities to get in trouble with the law and never be able to get a chance at redemption.”

What is next in the China-US trade war? – Arthur Kroeber

China is running out of steam in putting tariffs in US imports, but certainly not running out of options to fight the ongoing trade war, says economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know, to the South China Morning Post.

Alibaba: well positioned to enter Russia – Ashley Dudarenok

China internet giant Alibaba struck a major deal last week with Russia’s  Mail.ru – one of Russia’s leading tech and media conglomerates that is already called Russia’s Alibaba. A smart move says Russian Ashley Dudarenok, a veteran marketer on China’s e-commerce and author of Unlocking the World’s Largest E-market: A Guide To Selling on Chinese Social Media in the China Economic Review.

Can the next generation take over Alibaba from Jack Ma? – Shaun Rein

Alibaba’s chairman Jack Ma announced he will turn over the reins of his company to the next generation of executives next year. But business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The End of Cheap China, Revised and Updated: Economic and Cultural Trends That Will Disrupt the World, wonders if the new generation takes over Ma’s magic spell over staff, users and investors, he tells to Inkstone News. 

Trump wants US firms back from China – Arthur Kroeber

The focus has been on the Chinese government after US president Donald Trump announced new tariffs. But that might be wrong, says economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know to CNN. What Trump wants is not getting China into negotiations, but forcing US companies to come back to the US.

How #MeToo brought down China’s supermonk – Ian Johnson

The Venerable Xuecheng did become the symbol for supercharged Buddhism in China. Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, looks for the New York Times at how China’s #MeToo movement brought down this confusing factor in the rising Buddhism.

Why US firms cannot just leave China – Arthur Kroeber

The argument of the Trump administration is simple: if you want to avoid tariffs, leave China and come back to the US. That is too simple, says economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know, at the Asia Times.