Category Archives: Xinjiang

How do you define religion, and other questions for Ian Johnson

Author Ian Johnson got quite some people thinking after his most recent book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao hit the bookshelves. Some of them got stuck with questions and for Oclarim Johnson answers some of them. How does he define religion, and why are the Tibetans and Uighurs not included.

China’s long-standing trouble with Islam – Ian Johnson

China’s recent troubles with Islam and unruly provinces like Xinjiang are not new, nor typically for communist rule, writes journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, for the New York Review of books. “It would be tempting to say that all of this is just typical Communist excess, something in the party’s DNA that forces it to turn to repression and violence to solve problems. But the long history of Islam’s persecution points to older, deeper problems in the Chinese worldview.”

“China´s forgotten people” in Xinjiang, interview – Ian Johnson

Journalist and author Ian Johnson interviews Nick Holdstock, who recently published his book China’s Forgotten People: Xinjiang, Terror and the Chinese State for the New York Times. Terror attacks, and the government heavy-handed response have often blurred the image of Xinjiang´s natives.

Chances along China´s new silk road – Sara Hsu

Massive investments along the planned new silk road, and planned new economic zones, might offer cities in poorer provinces like Xinjiang and Yunnan great opportunities to develop, writes financial analyst Sara Hsu in the Diplomat.

China´s Xinjiang policies, James Leibold – Ian Johnson

Journalist Ian Johnson meets James Leibold, eminent researcher on China´s policies on ethnic minorities. After a dive into China´s historical take on Xinjiang, both dive into the current tense situation and recent violence. Ian Johnson asks questions for the New York Times.

Why China does not want moderate Uighurs – Ian Johnson

Journalist Ian Johnson interviewed Chinese intellectuals and asked them about Ilham Tohti, the economist and Uighur activist who was arrested in January. For the New York Review of Books looks for a reason why the moderate intellectual was arrested. China does not like moderate Uighurs, is one of his conclusions.