Category Archives: Nasdaq

Dropping China stocks are bad news – Sara Hsu

Investors in Chinese equity know from the past they have put their money on a roller-coaster. But the recent drop is very rough, and – says financial analyst Sara Hsu to the ChinaUSFocus, the drop is worse because much stock has been used as collateral for loans.

Pinduoduo just a ‘flash in the pan’? – Shaun Rein

The successful IPO of Pinduoduo,  the third e-commerce platform in China after Alibaba and JD.com, took many by surprise. But it does not mean Pinduoduo will be equally successful in the future, warns business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, at the South China Morning Post. Just days later, it was accused of hosting counterfeit goods.

Trade war concerns might hamper China’s tech companies – Sara Hsu

Figuring out who might be hurt by the trade war between China and the US is still be tough, but tech companies like Alibaba and Tencent see their US ties as a liability, says financial expert Sara Hsu to Cheddar. “The trade spat between Washington and Beijing has not only quelled investors’ appetites, it has also discouraged Chinese tech giants from expanding internationally.”

What made Pinduoduo so big? – Ben Cavender

For many outside China the successful IPO on Nasdaq of group purchasing platform Pinduoduo, mildly comparable to the less successful Groupon, came as a surprise. Shanghai-based business analyst Ben Cavender tries to explain the success at Inkstone. It uses the popular Tencent platforms WeChat and QQ.

At last: opening the China markets for IPO’s – Shaun Rein

Many successful Chinese companies listed in the US, rather than in China, because of the stringent regulations in their own country. Now going IPO in China is at least becoming easier, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to Harbour Times. And some Chinese companies might come back from the US.

Chinese spinoffs: a different story – Paul Gillis

Spinoffs are typically business transactions where the total of all entities increase their value by splitting up their existing business. But not so for Chinese companies, listed in the US, argues Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis. Not the shareholders or the company gains, but mostly management, he explains at his weblog.

HK audit regulations go downhill to attract US business – Paul Gillis

Many Chinese companies took a listing at US exchanges because audits in Hong Kong and on mainland exchanges were stricter. The HK stock market now is watering down regulations for audits, notes Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis on his website to his shock, to pull back those Chinese companies from the US.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.

Outbound China investment experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

2017 will not beat 2016 in terms of volume of outbound investments, but China is still expanding fast – despite increased government limits on financing outbound deals.A few of our speakers at the China Speakers Bureau focus on that development.

IPO-hungry tech firms might jump the queue in China – Paul Gillis

Financial authorities in Beijing are playing with the idea to give tech firms a faster-track IPO in China, says accounting professor Paul Gillis at his weblog. Taking away some of the cumbersome restrictions for IPO’s in China might lead to the expected ban of variable interest entity or VIE’s, a side-track allowing Chinese firms to list in the US, he suggests.