Category Archives: Beida

HK auditors: still not up to standards – Paul Gillis

Five years ago Hong Kong, once a center of international finance, was demoted by the European Union as a financial regulatory area on a similar footing. Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis applauds that after five years the HK legislators start to move to reform the auditors, but feels the action is far from enough, he writes on his weblog.

Chinese spinoffs: a different story – Paul Gillis

Spinoffs are typically business transactions where the total of all entities increase their value by splitting up their existing business. But not so for Chinese companies, listed in the US, argues Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis. Not the shareholders or the company gains, but mostly management, he explains at his weblog.

Can a trade war hit the Big Four? – Paul Gillis

Import duties – increased during a trade war – focus on goods, not services. Nevertheless, the Big Four accounting firms can still suffer from a trade war, writes Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis on his weblog. But those subtleties might not be spent on China when they are drawn into a full-scale trade war.

How KPMG Hong Kong got itself into serious problems – Paul Gillis

Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis describes on his weblog how auditor KPMG Hong Kong got itself into trouble for signing off papers on China Medical, a company convicted in 2012 for looting US$400 million from its investors. Problem: KPMG Hong Kong was not really in charge and now the Hong Kong legal system caught up with this omission.

How bike-sharing might work – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing firms like Mobike and Ofo might work out, explains Jeffrey Towson, investment professor at the Peking University. “It is unusual but not crazy,” he tells about the pervasive marketing strategy of bike-sharing. Independent assets moving around might just be the new thing.

Record fine for failed audit – Paul Gillis

Shinewing, leading Chinese CPA, got a record fine from China’s regulators for a failed audit of a listed company, writes professor Paul Gillis of Practice at Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management at his weblog Chinaaccountingblog. He applauds the tough action.

Bike-sharing: only at the start of their development – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing companies in China had a rough year, combining huge investments and limited returns. Smaller ones went bankrupt and market leaders Mobike and Ofo are rumored to discuss a merger. Peking University investment professor Jeffrey Towson still see enough room for success, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Will bike-share firms merge? Not yet – Jeffrey Towson

Will Mobike and Ofo, China’s largest bike-sharing companies merge, like car-sharing firm did in the past? Not yet, says Peking University professor Jeffrey Towson. International expansions goes well, capital is freely available, and a crippling price war has not yet emerged, he argues.

US regulator bans HK accounting firm – Paul Gillis

The efforts by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB)  to get access to Chinese data from US-listed Chinese firms went into a new phase as it banned a Hong Kong accounting firm, reports Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis on his weblog. It could be a new item on Trump’s China agenda, he suggests.

Is Alibaba cooking the Single’s Day books? – Paul Gillis

China’s e-commerce giant booked another record during its Single’s Day in 2017. But what figures is the company actually reporting? Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis dives into the figures at his Chinaaccountingblog.