Category Archives: JD.com

Why mobile commerce does not equal e-commerce – Ashley Dudarenok

Selling online in China needs a completely different approach compared to the rest of the world. Marketing veteran Ashley Dudarenok, author of Unlocking the World’s Largest E-Market: A Guide to Selling on Chinese Social Media explains to CER what the difference is between e-commerce and mobile commerce, and why mobile is dominant in China.

In China’s working culture, time’s are changing – William Bao Bean

For a long time, working around the clock – from 9 to 9, six days a week known as the 996-rule – was common in China’s startup working culture. But those times are changing, says SOSV managing director William Bao Bean, a leading voice in China’s startup scene to the BBC. “China has moved from a society that was told what to do, to one that is doing what it wants to, and that’s also a millennial thing,” he says.

Blockchain experts at the China Speakers Bureau

China’s financial authorities might be wary of Bitcoins and other digital currencies, but the country is embracing the underlying blockchain technology. Self-driving cars, agriculture, retail and other industries use the deep pockets of the government to introduce the new technology.
At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to make sense out of this new direction China is taking, leading the way for global innovation.

‘Made in China’ is no longer inferior, but who knows? – Shaun Rein

Chinese brands like Alibaba, WeChat and JD.com still face the perception they deliver inferior products when going global, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. They mainly focus on Chinese consumers who know better, but the barrier exists for global expansion, he tells the South China Morning Post.

IT-giants replace real estate tycoons in policy building – Shaun Rein

A strong shift from real estate tycoons to IT-giants marks a shift at China’s economy in the ongoing political meetings in Beijing, says author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to the South China Morning Post. “China is picking five to 10 private technology companies to make them national champions.”

Tencent’s investment positive for Wanda – Ben Cavender

Dalian Wanda Group’s commercial property arm secured a US$5.4 billion investment from a group led by tech giant Tencent Holdings, a major move for the troubled real estate giant, hoping to get a Shanghai IPO, says business analyst Ben Cavender to Reuters.

The China take on digital transformation

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

Diving into China business strategies

China’s companies are going global in a fast speed. A few decades ago China was only a few percent of the global economy, but those days are far behind us. What happens in China, now has global impact, and what Chinese companies do, cannot be ignored.

How WeChat mini programs took off – Matthew Brennan

Tencent’s WeChat started early 2017 their mini programs, a solution away from full blown apps, or building a platform, to help brands on their service. WeChat expert Matthew Brennan explains at the JingDaily how why the mini programs took off successfully after a slow start.

What do Chinese companies do different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.