Category Archives: HNA

IT-giants replace real estate tycoons in policy building – Shaun Rein

A strong shift from real estate tycoons to IT-giants marks a shift at China’s economy in the ongoing political meetings in Beijing, says author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order┬áto the South China Morning Post. “China is picking five to 10 private technology companies to make them national champions.”

Diving into China business strategies

China’s companies are going global in a fast speed. A few decades ago China was only a few percent of the global economy, but those days are far behind us. What happens in China, now has global impact, and what Chinese companies do, cannot be ignored.

What do Chinese companies do different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.

What do auditors know about HNA? – Paul Gillis

Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis points at his weblog at the rumor Goldman Sachs has decided to suspend work on a HNA subsidiary IPO in the US, because they are unable to get enough information on this Chinese conglomerate. Gillis wonders what auditor PwC knows about their client.