Category Archives: Haier

China’s success factor: skipping the middle management – William Bao Bean

In the search for answers to the question why Chinese companies do so well, corporate analyst William Bao Bean sees one key difference with Western competitors: many Chinese companies skipped the middle management and organized internal structures fundamentally different, he explains in Venturebeat.

The China take on digital transformation

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

Diving into China business strategies

China’s companies are going global in a fast speed. A few decades ago China was only a few percent of the global economy, but those days are far behind us. What happens in China, now has global impact, and what Chinese companies do, cannot be ignored.

What do Chinese companies do different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.

China: struggling for its position in the world – Tom Doctoroff

China gains economic and financial power, but is still struggling to find its place in the world, writes China veteran Tom Doctoroff in the Huffington Post.”So China’s road to becoming a “soft” superpower will be long and rocky indeed,” he says.

Innovation experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Innovation and China seemed have been at odds for a long time. But the country known for its copy-cats has made huge strides forward, and innovation has become a key feature in the country´s development. Not surprising, also speakers at the China Speakers Bureau reflect that important development.

Fintech experts at the China Speakers Bureau

From a cash country, where transactions were done by moving plastic bags with money between bank branches, China has turned into a leading force in fintech or financiel technology. Mobile payment are standard. Bitcoins and blockchain technology found in China early adopters. Social media have – more than anywhere in the world – adopted payment systems to facilitate online trade.

The disrupting power of China’s consumers – Jeffrey Towson

China’s consumers are becoming increasingly a force the rest of the world has to take into account, writes Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson at his weblog. Not only have Chinese more disposable income, they not only go for cheap offers, and regularly disrupt the world.

Haier’s boss surprises his acquired US employees – Bill Fischer

When Haier took over GE’s Appliances, US management feared the future. But the Chinese takeover is very different from the American style, they discovered. Western firms are victim of their traditional viewpoints, tells IMD-professor Bill Fischer, who studied Haier’s very different corporate style, to AP.