Category Archives: Baidu

Google will have a hard time in China – Shaun Rein

Google needs a strategy to enter China if it wants another one billion users, but that is not going to be easy, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order in the Hindustan Times. Especially since China’s search engine Baidu is way better in speaking Chinese.

Internet experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Twenty years ago Chinese academics sent their first online message and since then the internet has changed China beyond recognition. Despite efforts by the government to keep freedom of speech in check, China´s internet users are freer than even. A few of our speakers are key experts in this field.

The China take on digital transformation

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

Europe lags behind China digitally – Mark Greeven

China is way ahead of Europe when it comes to its digital transformation, says Zhejiang University professor Mark Greeven, author of Business Ecosystems in China: Alibaba and Competing Baidu, Tencent, Xiaomi and LeEco to the NRC. Europe is way over-regulated compared to China, he says, and companies get in China much more leeway to experiment.

Internet giants changed into investment vehicles – Shaun Rein

Internet giants Baidu, Tencent and Alibaba increasingly buy into innovative companies to stay ahead of the competition. They have become dominant investment vehicles, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to the South China Morning Post.

European companies need to act fast to catch up with China – Mark Greeven

European companies are running behind in defining a good strategy in catching up with China, writes Mark Greeven, professor at the Zhejiang University,  in the LSE Business Review. “The reality is that Chinese companies have no choice but to innovate and upgrade in global value chains.”

At last: opening the China markets for IPO’s – Shaun Rein

Many successful Chinese companies listed in the US, rather than in China, because of the stringent regulations in their own country. Now going IPO in China is at least becoming easier, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to Harbour Times. And some Chinese companies might come back from the US.

In China’s working culture, time’s are changing – William Bao Bean

For a long time, working around the clock – from 9 to 9, six days a week known as the 996-rule – was common in China’s startup working culture. But those times are changing, says SOSV managing director William Bao Bean, a leading voice in China’s startup scene to the BBC. “China has moved from a society that was told what to do, to one that is doing what it wants to, and that’s also a millennial thing,” he says.

Blockchain experts at the China Speakers Bureau

China’s financial authorities might be wary of Bitcoins and other digital currencies, but the country is embracing the underlying blockchain technology. Self-driving cars, agriculture, retail and other industries use the deep pockets of the government to introduce the new technology.
At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to make sense out of this new direction China is taking, leading the way for global innovation.

National rules for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

After local regulations in Beijing, Shanghai, and Chongqing to organize tests with self-driving cars, China’s central government now has issued national rules to streamline those tests, writes Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight.