Category Archives: Alibaba

How ‘social’ became crucial for internet business in China – Shaun Rein

Social connectivity has become crucial for life and business in China. “If you want to do well as an internet company today, you need to be strong on the social aspect, otherwise you won’t be able to gain any traction,” tells business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to the South China Morning Post.

In China’s working culture, time’s are changing – William Bao Bean

For a long time, working around the clock – from 9 to 9, six days a week known as the 996-rule – was common in China’s startup working culture. But those times are changing, says SOSV managing director William Bao Bean, a leading voice in China’s startup scene to the BBC. “China has moved from a society that was told what to do, to one that is doing what it wants to, and that’s also a millennial thing,” he says.

Blockchain experts at the China Speakers Bureau

China’s financial authorities might be wary of Bitcoins and other digital currencies, but the country is embracing the underlying blockchain technology. Self-driving cars, agriculture, retail and other industries use the deep pockets of the government to introduce the new technology.
At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to make sense out of this new direction China is taking, leading the way for global innovation.

‘Made in China’ is no longer inferior, but who knows? – Shaun Rein

Chinese brands like Alibaba, WeChat and JD.com still face the perception they deliver inferior products when going global, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. They mainly focus on Chinese consumers who know better, but the barrier exists for global expansion, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Jack Ma, do not leave women behind – Zhang Lijia

Gender discrimination is commonplace in China, out of line with international agreements and practices. Author Zhang Lijia asks Alibaba’s chairman Jack Ma, and other tech companies like Tencent, and the government, to end rampant discrimination against women on the work floor, for the New York Times.

How WeChat Pay took off with digital red envelopes – Matthew Brennan

When Tencent started during the 2014 CCTV New Year show to promote giving red envelopes online, few realized it was the successful kick-off what is now known as WeChat Pay, says WeChat expert Matthew Brennan to the JingDaily. Some luxury brands did not like the concept though: “The idea of a discount communicates value and is generally not an incentive that luxury brands want to be associated with.”

How Tencent, Alibaba dominate private business – Shaun Rein

Private companies in China can only survive when they team up with Tencent or Alibaba, creating a business scene that is unprecedented, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order  to the South China Morning Post. “They basically have a gun to your head and you have to choose which of the two companies you want to work with.”

Both Alipay and WeChat Pay can survive in China – Matthew Brennan

Much attention goes to the epic battle between China’s internet giants Alibaba and Tencent. But WeChat expert Matthew Brennan does not see why one of their payment systems, Alipay and WeChat Pay, should defeat the other. He sees room enough for both, he tells That’s Magazine.

How lagging China became a frontrunner in mobile payments – Ben Cavender

Cash was king, not so long ago in China. But as wealth and the middle class increased, mobile payments had an advantage, says business analyst Ben Cavender. Because other payment tools like cards did not have a solid footprint, eager smartphone users adopted mobile payments quickly, he tells That’s Magazine. But: “Realistically, I don’t think cash will go away entirely, but it will certainly be relegated to a less important role.”

How startups can avoid Facebook and Google – William Bao Bean

Startups are mostly at the mercy of quasi-monopolies like Facebook, Google, Tencent or Alibaba. William Bao Bean, managing director of Shanghai-based SOSV tells in this elevator talk how his no.1 accelerator helps them to avoid spending money on those giants to get access to an audience, creating a win-win situation.