Category Archives: Alibaba

What’s the deal with Alibaba’s new retail? – Tom Doctoroff

Supermarkets in China (and where not) have been unfriendly for innovation – to put it mildly. But Alibaba’s HEMA’s supermarkets, starting the so-called “new retail”, are causing a revolution, writes marketing guru Tom Doctoroff in AdAge. 25 Stores are functional and dozens more will be open soon.

China’s success factor: skipping the middle management – William Bao Bean

In the search for answers to the question why Chinese companies do so well, corporate analyst William Bao Bean sees one key difference with Western competitors: many Chinese companies skipped the middle management and organized internal structures fundamentally different, he explains in Venturebeat.

Zhejiang: the new hot spot for billionaires – Rupert Hoogewerf

hejiang province, with its capital Hangzhou, have developed into a preferred destination for billionaires, says Rupert Hoogewerf, founder of the Hurun China rich list. Zhejiang not only passed domestic cities like Beijing and Shanghai, but also Paris and San Francisco in the 2018 Hurun report, writes the Digital Journal.

Alibaba needs older customers to maintain growth – Ben Cavender

E-commerce giant Alibaba launched this week a special app for the older people at Taobao, its online shopping website. A logical step, says retail analyst Ben Cavender to Reuters. “It’s easier now than it was in the past to get some of these older users to actually open up their wallets and spend.”

The China take on digital transformation

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

What if your customers cannot pronounce your name – Shaun Rein

Chinese brands like Huawei and Xiaomi have not only legal problems to enter the lucrative US market, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. It would also help if potential buyers would be able to pronounce the name of the product they are expected to purchase, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Diving into China business strategies

China’s companies are going global in a fast speed. A few decades ago China was only a few percent of the global economy, but those days are far behind us. What happens in China, now has global impact, and what Chinese companies do, cannot be ignored.

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi top 2017 best Chinese unicorns – Rupert Hoogewerf

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi made it to the top-3 Chinese unicorns in 2017 on a list of 120 most successful unicorns in Greater China, announced the Hurun Greater China Unicorn 2017 Index last week. Beijing is leading the pack, says Hurun founder Rupert Hoogewerf, followed by Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Hangzhou. Keeping up with the amazing growth is tough, Hoogewerf tells AsiaVenturepedia.

Why the World Internet Conference mattered – William Bao Bean

The World Internet Conference in Wuzhen has long been derived as part of China’s propaganda tool. But those days are over, writes William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelerator, who attended the conference last month, together with IT leaders from the US and China, he writes in Medium. “It is going to be a wild ride.”

What do Chinese companies do different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.