Tag Archives: Ian Johnson

The future of religion in China – Ian Johnson

Journalist Ian Johnson documented in this book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao how an estimated 350 million Chinese citizens found solace in religion, despite a ambiguous governments. In TimesOut Shanghai he tells how he feels that movement will develop in the future.

One-Belt, One-Road: all roads lead to China

One of the major global initiatives by China was the One-Belt, One-Road (OBOR),reviving the old silk roads. And while it is an open platform, major trade partners of China are currently not part of the initiative, including Australia, the UK and the US. Major disputes, like the Ausgrid, Brexit and Hickley cases, might only add to the worries countries should have when looking at their relation with China, without being part of OBOR.

Political experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Under president Xi Jinping, politics has become more dynamic than under his predecessor Hu Jintao. Anti-corruption, political reforms and increased infighting between different factions mark the news on an almost daily basis. And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China´s political development.

Hooked on the opium of the people – Ian Johnson

An estimated 350 million Chinese are hooked to different religions, looking for a way to deal with the lack of morality of their current society. The Spectator reviews positively Ian Johnson’s book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, and describes a major change in China’s cultural fabric.

China’s search for happiness – Ian Johnson

Most of China has left poverty behind, but people are still not happy. The search for moral values is now taking over the desire among China’s citizens, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in PRI. How turning to religion can change the country.

Foreign involvement: the red line in China’s spiritual revival – Ian Johnson

Staying away from foreign involvement is key in the massive religious revival China is going through, author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao tells NPR. Religion is condoned as long as the new movements stick to a few unwritten rules in its sensitive relations with the Communist Party.

A spiritual revival changes China – Ian Johnson

Hundreds of millions Chinese turn to religion, as part of a spiritual revival, tells author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao to CBN. “While the government remains deeply suspicious of China’s religious revival, Johnson says it hasn’t stopped people from exploring matters of faith.”

Illegal churches: large, and condoned by the government – Ian Johnson

Not registered gatherings of religious believers have been a major force in the growing search for religion in China, but – says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the Atlantic – they have largely been condoned by the government, and Johnson does not believe that might change.

China’s search for a moral foundation – Ian Johnson

To get rich is glorious was China’s leading principle for decades, but slowly the country starts to search for a moral foundation, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao to PJMedia. “According to Johnson, China lacks the mechanisms the U.S. has available for creating social change. In China.”

Religion: ways for a better society – Ian Johnson

Author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao discusses Taoism, Christianity and Buddhism and how they help Chinese citizens’ ideals and hopes for a better society at the Asia Society.