Blog Archives

Luxury goods experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

China´s economic growth might be slowing down a bit, and its economy might not be the boost the global economy needs, but the luxury goods industry could be the exception. China´s consumers, whether at home or abroad, are still buying themselves silly.

President Xi Jinping might be spoiling the party a bit with his anti-corruption drive, but apart from the liquor departments, luxury goods are selling a lot. A few of the speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can give you some guidance.

Risk management experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Foreign companies fear an increasing risk in China, now the government is tightening legal supervision, fighting corruption and banning business practices that were considered to be common up to a year ago. GSK might be one of the high-profile cases in the anti-corruption drive, but no foreign company or industry is not worried about those changes. The China Speakers Bureau can offer a range of experts on risk management in China.

Sticking to the law might be a good idea – Shaun Rein

Australian Crown expats who get incarcerated illustrate that sticking to China´s rules and regulations might be a good idea when doing business in China. Airbnb and Apple even risk a backlash of their Western constituency by hosting their China data in China. Still the best way to move forward, says Shanghai-based business analyst Shaun Rein in The Street.

Delivery companies: no global players yet – Shaun Rein

Logistics firms in China, like ZTO Express, build on the booming e-commerce. Despite their success in China, it might take quite some time before they become global players like FedEx or UPS says business analyst Shaun Rein, and author of The End of Copycat China: The Rise of Creativity, Innovation, and Individualism in Asia,to CNBC.

Why Yum, Starbucks are lagging in China – Shaun Rein

Getting traction among China´s picky consumers is one thing, keeping it up is another. Larger foreign firms like Yum and Starbucks have been slow in picking up consumer trends in China, says business analyst Shaun Rein to Bloomberg, for example in their adoption of fintech developments.

The fallout of the Anbang withdrawal – Shaun Rein

The move by Blackstone not to sell a landmark California hotel to the Anbang Insurance group for security concerns shows domestic volatility in the US and serious risk for Chinese companies looking for investment opportunities, says business analyst Shaun Rein to the South China Morning Post.

Fashion brands: caught between global and local aspirations – Shaun Rein

Western fashion brands have a hard time succeeding in China. Getting local was the old mantra, but as globetrotting Chinese find a difference between localized products and their global appeal, they also have a problem, says branding expert Shaun Rein to Reuters.

China´s innovation curve – Shaun Rein

Being perceived as a bull in China does not bother him, tells business analyst Shaun Rein in the China Daily. His on-the-ground observations and research are a solid foundation, for example for what he calls China innovation curve.

Samsung has a leadership problem – Shaun Rein

The global recall of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 has plunged the Korean company into disarray. Samsung was already a long time without leadership, says business analyst Shaun Rein to Bloomberg, but the disaster has only become worse, after the latest disaster.

Samsung is done in China – Shaun Rein

China´s users of the Samsung Note 7 were already upset the Korean company did not pull back their faulty model from the Chinese market, like they did elsewhere. Now Samsung had to withdraw all Note 7 phones globally, they are in China done in their largest market, says business analyst Shaun Rein to Bloomberg.