Blog Archives

China needs revised traffic laws to push self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

When Baidu CEO Robin Li was arrested by Beijing police for sitting in a self-driving car, it was obvious the country needed an update of its traffic laws, just like the US, Australia and several European countries did have. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub gives at his firm’s website an overview of what is needed to support the development of self-driving cars, including testing on public roads and setting standards.

Strategy experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Making sense out of China has always been challenging, although the questions companies and people have to ask themselves change permanently. From a rather uregulated booming economy, now dealing we a tsunami of new rules, anti-corruption and a – relatively – slowing economy changes the strategic questions you have to deal with And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China┬┤s strategic challenges. We have a selection here (but you can always ask for more).

New strict regulations for infant formula – Mark Schaub

China has released new rules for infant formula milk powder, one of the most-discussed products after massive domestic scandals and waves of foreign imports, both legally and illegally. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub discusses at Lexology the impact, as domestic and foreign formulas are now treated equally, and it is going to be more complicated.

Risk and opportunities of the bitcoin – Mark Schaub

Chinese authorities have started to regulate the usage of the bitcoin. That is not necessarily a bad thing, writes Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the website of his law firm. “Regulation should be seen as an opportunity, too. More stringent rules translate to lower investment risk and increased legitimacy.”

Crack-down on pyramid schemes hits MLM-firms – Mark Schaub

Foreign multi-level marketing (MLM) firms like Herbalife, Nu Skin and Usana Health Sciences got into trouble as Chinese authorities turned in a 3-month campaign against domestic illegal pyramid schemes. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub explains the background at the China Law Insight.

Outbound China investment experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

2017 will not beat 2016 in terms of volume of outbound investments, but China is still expanding fast – despite increased government limits on financing outbound deals.A few of our speakers at the China Speakers Bureau focus on that development.

China develops rules for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

China is moving fast in developing self-driving cars, but also authorities move fast in paving the legal roads for those cars by developing Draft Guidelines, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub in Lexology. The ambitious approach is in line with the technological improvements, the government is having on its agenda.

Legal challenges of network marketing – Mark Schaub

China has become the testing ground of many international network marketing companies, as many Chinese consumers prefer foreign brands. But apart from opportunities, Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub also sees legal challenges of operating in this new promised land, he writes in Lexology.

Rules for self-driving cars getting up to speed – Mark Schaub

Tesla was the latest to announce the building of its car plant in Shanghai, but self-driving and electric cars are making many inroads in China. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub gives for Lexology an overview of the latest regulations to facilitate this trend. China seems to be late follow the latests developments, but catching up fast, he says.

E-commerce experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

If at any place the switch from brick-and-mortar is going fast, it is China. Permanent online consumers comment, exchange information, and buy 24/7. When you sit down in a restaurant, you first ask the code for the free wifi, before the menu. When you travel abroad, you constantly discuss with friends and family back how, what to buy, or what not to buy.