Blog Archives

The China take on digital transformation

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

China’s road ahead for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) has published last week an ambitious draft road map for the development of self-driving cars in the coming decades. Lawyer Mark Schaub summarizes the latest details of the fast-moving central planning office on the China Law Insight.

Making maps: key for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

Map makers have always found legal restrictions by the Chinese government as a barrier on their way. But now the country wants to become a leader in self-driving cars, Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub expects fast changes in the legal bureaucracy for maps, he tells at China Law Insight. Restrictions for foreign investors might stay in place, he fears.

Beijing rules as first on self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

Getting rid of legal barriers is key for using innovation in real life, and Beijing approved the first regulations in China on self-driving cars, writes lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight. He elaborates on the details. “We expect more regions to follow Beijing’s lead and compete for innovation in this key sector,” he adds.

What do Chinese companies do different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.

China needs revised traffic laws to push self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

When Baidu CEO Robin Li was arrested by Beijing police for sitting in a self-driving car, it was obvious the country needed an update of its traffic laws, just like the US, Australia and several European countries did have. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub gives at his firm’s website an overview of what is needed to support the development of self-driving cars, including testing on public roads and setting standards.

Strategy experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

Making sense out of China has always been challenging, although the questions companies and people have to ask themselves change permanently. From a rather uregulated booming economy, now dealing we a tsunami of new rules, anti-corruption and a – relatively – slowing economy changes the strategic questions you have to deal with And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China´s strategic challenges. We have a selection here (but you can always ask for more).

New strict regulations for infant formula – Mark Schaub

China has released new rules for infant formula milk powder, one of the most-discussed products after massive domestic scandals and waves of foreign imports, both legally and illegally. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub discusses at Lexology the impact, as domestic and foreign formulas are now treated equally, and it is going to be more complicated.

Risk and opportunities of the bitcoin – Mark Schaub

Chinese authorities have started to regulate the usage of the bitcoin. That is not necessarily a bad thing, writes Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the website of his law firm. “Regulation should be seen as an opportunity, too. More stringent rules translate to lower investment risk and increased legitimacy.”