Blog Archives

A review of the Cultural Revolution – Ian Johnson

Many have been remembering in 2016 the anniversary of both start and finish of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), and many scholars used the moment to publish their views on this ground-shattering event in the country´s recent history. Journalist Ian Johnson, author of the upcoming book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao reviews some of the milestones in the troublesome academic research for ChinaFile.

How funny can China be? – Ian Johnson

The outside world mostly does not know China for its humor, although it adopted a Chinese variation youmo. Journalist Ian Johnson discusses with Christopher Rea, author of The Age of Irreverence: A New History of Laughter in China, at the New York Times humor in China.

Cultural change experts at the China Speakers Bureau

China is proud about its millennia old culture, but just like the rest of society, its culture is also changing very fast. Old concepts like guanxi, losing face and the suppressed position of women are not what they were even a few decades ago. Many so-called China experts still cling to those old idea, but fortunately, we can offer a range of speakers at the China Speakers Bureau who have a clear view on how China´s culture is changing.

The monthly trip of Liu Xia – Ian Johnson

Award-winning journalist Ian Johnson reports in ChinaFile on the monthly trip poet Liu Xia makes to visit her husband, Nobel price winner Lui Xiaobo, and her slowly increasing production of new poems. “A small, fragile woman with extremely short-cropped hair that sets off her high cheekbones and bright, wide eyes.”

State tightens rules for religious groups – Ian Johnson

Religions have become more popular in China, but the government tries now to tighten rules for religious group, writes journalist Ian Johnson, author of the upcoming book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the New York Times. Rules on religion are changed for the first time in a decade.

One-Belt, One-Road: good news for some, bad news for others (updated)

One of the major global initiatives by China was the One-Belt, One-Road (OBOR),reviving the old silk roads. And while it is an open platform, major trade partners of China are currently not part of the initiative, including Australia, the UK and the US. Major disputes, like the Ausgrid, Brexit and Hickley cases, might only add to the worries countries should have when looking at their relation with China, without being part of OBOR.

“One of the most insightful commentators on modern China” – Ian Johnson

Much praise for the essay by journalist Ian Johnson in The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China, by Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a “handle on modern history”, according to the Asian Review of Books. Ian Johnson is the author of the upcoming book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao.

Making banned documentaries – Ian Johnson interviews Ai Xiaoming

Ai Xiaoming is one of China´s leading documentary makers, and all of them are officially banned in the country. Journalist Ian Johnson sits down with her for the NY Review of Books and discusses how it is to make banned documentaries, and (amongst many other subjects) why China has no intellectuals.

The revival of islam in China – Ian Johnson

When it comes to reviving moral values in China, most attention goes to Christianity. But in an interview for the New York Times with Matthew S. Erie, author of China and Islam: The Prophet, the Party, and Law journalist Ian Johnson hears the Islam is a similar emerging religious force. Ian Johnson is the author of the upcoming book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao

Media experts at the China Speakers Bureau (updated)

China´s media industry might be one of the toughest to grasp for the outside world. All media are state-owned, very much restricted, and got recently into trouble because they have been extorting companies. Nothing is what you might expert. Some guidance is needed, and fortunately we have a range of media experts at the China Speakers Bureau.