Latest Articles

China’s search for happiness – Ian Johnson

Most of China has left poverty behind, but people are still not happy. The search for moral values is now taking over the desire among China’s citizens, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in PRI. How turning to religion can change the country.

Drug scandals will dwarf China’s food scandals – Jeffrey Towson

Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson gives on his weblog reasons why China’s drug scandals will be larger than any of its past food scandals. Morbidity is larger. Drug scandals are harder to detect and the profitability of the fake drug industry is higher. More troublesome: the industry is going global.

Foreign involvement: the red line in China’s spiritual revival – Ian Johnson

Staying away from foreign involvement is key in the massive religious revival China is going through, author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao tells NPR. Religion is condoned as long as the new movements stick to a few unwritten rules in its sensitive relations with the Communist Party.

Sex workers in China: between market economy and filial piety – Zhang Lijia

Twelve year it took author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel to write her book on prostitution in China. She sits down with Josh Chin of the Wall Street Journal to discuss how women are caught between the country’s market economy and filial piety.

Now Didi comes after Uber globally – William Bao Bean

China’s ride hailing app Didi Chuxing just raised over US$5 billion, more than it would need for its China operation. After kicking Uber out of China, Didi might be preparing to go after the US company on a global scale, suggests managing director of the Chinaccelerator William Bao Bean to Bloomberg.

Beijing: the center of spirituality – Ian Johnson

Beijing is regaining its position of China’s spiritual universe, writes author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the New York Times. While much of its past has been destroyed, the city where Johnson lives is now regaining its position of China’s spiritual capital. A struggle between commerce, communist and traditional values.

Hot pot: too early for a Western market – Shaun Rein

The successful hot-pot chain HaiDiLao is not only expanding fast in China, but has also set its eyes on foreign markets. That might be too early, judges business analyst Shaun Rein in Bloomberg. Moving into markets with different requirements might be too dangerous, especially outside Asia.

Haier’s boss surprises his acquired US employees – Bill Fischer

When Haier took over GE’s Appliances, US management feared the future. But the Chinese takeover is very different from the American style, they discovered. Western firms are victim of their traditional viewpoints, tells IMD-professor Bill Fischer, who studied Haier’s very different corporate style, to AP.

Why our startups do not focus on the US, yet – William Bao Bean

Shanghai-based VC William Bao Bean explains why the China startups he supports focus on South-East Asia and Eastern Europe, rather than the US. “We are trying to break the grip of Google and Facebook on startups.”

A spiritual revival changes China – Ian Johnson

Hundreds of millions Chinese turn to religion, as part of a spiritual revival, tells author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao to CBN. “While the government remains deeply suspicious of China’s religious revival, Johnson says it hasn’t stopped people from exploring matters of faith.”

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