Latest Articles

Daoism is key to understand China – Ian Johnson

Daoism is key to understand today’s China, says journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao. to ABC News. “You can provide values, an escape for people, or turn inward to piety, but you cannot challenge the Government. You can’t be an alternative source of values or the Government will turn against you.”

How WeChat is different in sharing data – Matthew Brennan

Tencent’s WeChat, one of China’s leading data companies, might be easier in sharing data with the government compared to its Western competitors, says WeChat expert Matthew Brennan. But when it comes to sharing data with marketeers, the company is way more restrictive, he tells in Harvard Political Review.

China’s changing attitude towards white people – Kaiser Kuo

When opening and reform of China took off, Western visitors were received as saviors. But that attitude has changed dramatically, writes Chinese-American Kaiser Kuo at SupChina. “While I full-throatedly decry this kind of anti-foreignism, I think at some level it’s entirely natural, and I’m actually thankful that it’s kept mostly in check,” he says.

How bike-sharing might work – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing firms like Mobike and Ofo might work out, explains Jeffrey Towson, investment professor at the Peking University. “It is unusual but not crazy,” he tells about the pervasive marketing strategy of bike-sharing. Independent assets moving around might just be the new thing.

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi top 2017 best Chinese unicorns – Rupert Hoogewerf

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi made it to the top-3 Chinese unicorns in 2017 on a list of 120 most successful unicorns in Greater China, announced the Hurun Greater China Unicorn 2017 Index last week. Beijing is leading the pack, says Hurun founder Rupert Hoogewerf, followed by Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Hangzhou. Keeping up with the amazing growth is tough, Hoogewerf tells AsiaVenturepedia.

33 Ways to dispel a mistress – Zhang Lijia

The BBC reports on a booming, but secretive industry in China: how to get rid of the mistress of your husband. Author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China explains why flaws in the current divorce rules cause this weird phenomena.

Beijing rules as first on self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

Getting rid of legal barriers is key for using innovation in real life, and Beijing approved the first regulations in China on self-driving cars, writes lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight. He elaborates on the details. “We expect more regions to follow Beijing’s lead and compete for innovation in this key sector,” he adds.

Beijing shatters China dream for migrants – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel, a book on prostitution in China, comments on the forceful eviction of migrants in Beijing. It shatters their China dream, she tells Sky News. How can you do that when you call yourself a socialist country?

KPMG partners sued over another US accounting spat – Paul Gillis

China and the US worked out a deal on the age-old argument where Chinese firms are not allowed to hand over paperwork to US institutions for audits. But the agreement is not valid for Hong Kong, and so close to a hundred current and former KPMG partners got sued over the case of the bankrupt China Medical, reports Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis last week at his weblog.

Fosun’s Tsingtao purchase might go down well – Ben Cavender

China’s financial authorities have scrutinized over 2017 many deals by Chinese companies, but the purchase by Fosun of the Asahi 19.9% stake in China’s key brewer Tsingtao might go down well with them because the capital goes into a domestic company, explains business analyst Ben Cavender to Reuters. 

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