Latest Articles

Coca-Cola is on the wrong track selling a tin of water for US$9 – Tom Doctoroff

Coca-Cola surprised many branding experts by launching a tin of sparkling water called ‘Valser’ to Chinese consumers for US$9. It is not impossible, says branding guru Tom Doctoroff to the South China Morning Post, but then they have to change their marketing dramatically. “Turn it into a social currency,” Doctoroff says.

Jacky Chan as China’s soft power force – Ben Cavender

Gaining soft power is not an exclusive issue for China’s government. Jacky Chan and Wanda might be equally important for how the world sees China, says branding expert Ben Cavender to the South China Morning Post.

The future of religion in China – Ian Johnson

Journalist Ian Johnson documented in this book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao how an estimated 350 million Chinese citizens found solace in religion, despite a ambiguous governments. In TimesOut Shanghai he tells how he feels that movement will develop in the future.

Lotus: a mirror of China’s society – Zhang Lijia

Sarah Mellors reviews for the LA Review of Books Zhang Lijia’s Lotus: A Novel. The novel is a telling story of how China’s society works, she says, and both main characters Lotus and Bing illustrate many issues: rural-urban divide, economic development without political liberalization, the post-Mao moral vacuum and money worshiping, and the tension between so-called traditional Chinese values and modern concerns.

Hooked on the opium of the people – Ian Johnson

An estimated 350 million Chinese are hooked to different religions, looking for a way to deal with the lack of morality of their current society. The Spectator reviews positively Ian Johnson’s book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, and describes a major change in China’s cultural fabric.

How to push ahead with private hospitals – Jeffrey Towson

Medical reform in China has been lagging, and private hospitals hardly play a role, because patients to not trust them, and medical staff does not want to leave state-funded career. Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson explains on his weblog what could be a road to reform, with the help of investment bankers.

China: going fully cashless – Ben Cavender

China might have invented the paper money, it is most likely also the first one to go fully cashless, says retail analyst Ben Cavender to Motherboard. “People basically run their lives through smartphones in China.”

China’s search for global power – Howard French

Howard French, author of Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power explains at the Pulitzer Center how China is searching for power at an international stage, and how the global power might change its relationship with Hong Kong and Taiwan.

What to do when you fail in China – Jeffrey Towson

Carlsberg and Ford are two Western companies who were on they way down in China, but managed to renew themselves. Beida Business professor Jeffrey Towson uses on his website their examples to explain what companies can do to change their China operation for the better to draw some important lessons. (With a sidestep to Nanjing Fiat)

Franchising is key for Yum! in China – Jeffrey Towson

Yum! China has been spun-off and needs a solid strategy to grow in China. Franchising is such a key strategy, writes Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson on his weblog. ” This is exactly what 3G Capital has done since acquiring Burger King.”

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