Category Archives: politics

Where Xi Jinping has been failing – Ian Johnson

China annual political meetings passed without any great upheaval, but not all is well for president Xi Jinping, writes veteran journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the New York Review of Book. No legal reforms, no successor, and then there is the economy.

PBOC promises for fintech and startups – Andy Mok

Business analyst Andy Mok has nine take-away’s from this week’s central bank’s press conference. Fintech and startups got priority from the government, he writes in CGTN, and they prepare for global expansion. But domesticallly virtual currencies and digital payment systems are kept under control to avoid capital flight.

Jeffrey Towson: focus on China 2025

How does the world look like in 2025 when China and the Chinese continue to develop like they do now? After his well-received speech at LocWorld earlier this month, Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson started to focus his speeches on that subject:

Conflicting messages hurt business confidence – Shaun Rein

On one hand China tries to embark with “One Belt, One Road” on a massive global expansion. But financial limitations on the outflow of capital go against that. Those conflicting messages makes business people worried about what road to take, says business analyst Shaun Rein to the South China Morning Post.

Supreme court does not declare VIE’s illegal – Paul Gillis

Company constructions via fiscal paradises, VIE’s or variable interest entities, are regular ways to avoid corporate government restrictions in China, and under official attack just for that. The Supreme Court fielded a verdict on transactions by one of those VIE’s, but – says accounting professor Paul Gillis on his weblog, it did not clarify whether VIE’s might lose their validity.

China does not need bombs to fight a war – Shaun Rein

South-Korea is not the first country to see China can fight an argument without sending the army in: Japan and France are just a few examples where tinkering with economic power was more effective, for example by redirecting its tourists. It is easier to bully South Korea than Japan,” says business analyst Shaun Rein in the South China Morning Post.

What Xinjiang needs is de-escalation – Ian Johnson

While religion is getting more leeway in China, the opposite is happening for the Tibetans and Uighur, says journalist Ian Johnson, author of the upcoming book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the Globe&Mail. Just last week Xinjiang, home to the Uighur, saw a strong increase in security forces.

China’s gunboat diplomacy, past and present – Howard French

How do China’s current global efforts to expand its power, link to its past as a world might? Journalist Howard French explores in his new book Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power the historical roots of China’s position as a world power.

Repressing religion in China is not the big picture – Ian Johnson

The forceful removal of crosses at churches and the arrest of Christians have hit of Western media regularly. But that is not the big picture, says journalist Ian Johnson, author of the upcoming book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, at CNN. Those government actions are mainly symbolic, he says.

At last, Beijing might get serious about North Korea – Paul French

China has been trying to ignore its unruly neighbor North Korea for as long as it was possible. And North Korea was more interested in talking to the US, and less to China. But Beijing might at last be changing its tune, says Paul French, author of North Korea: State of Paranoia (Asian Arguments) to the Washington Post.