Category Archives: law

China develops rules for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

China is moving fast in developing self-driving cars, but also authorities move fast in paving the legal roads for those cars by developing Draft Guidelines, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub in Lexology. The ambitious approach is in line with the technological improvements, the government is having on its agenda.

Rules for self-driving cars getting up to speed – Mark Schaub

Tesla was the latest to announce the building of its car plant in Shanghai, but self-driving and electric cars are making many inroads in China. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub gives for Lexology an overview of the latest regulations to facilitate this trend. China seems to be late follow the latests developments, but catching up fast, he says.

Health food: moving to more open supervision – Mark Schaub

The China Food and Drug Administration (“CFDA”) has released in April a draft regulation for supervision of so-called health food. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub of King & Wood Mallesons sees it as an open way to discuss a new system of filing, and less registration, he writes in Lexology.

Why Canada (and others) should help catch corrupt officials – Shaun Rein

China has been claiming huge success in their “fox hunt”, an effort to retrive corrupt officials who fled abroad to escape prosecution. Canada was a main safe haven for them. Business analyst Shaun Rein explains in the Globe&Mail why helping China is a good idea, despite misgivings about the country´s judicial system.

Rules for cross-border e-commerce no reason for panic – Mark Schaub

The new rules on taxation of cross-border e-commerce have caused fear the government is trying to kill an increasingly lucrative industry. It was inevitable the government would start to regulate – not kill – this booming business, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub in Lexology. The timing was a surprise, and unfortunately, regulations are not very clear, he adds.

Going to court might be the wrong strategy in China – Shaun Rein

New England shoe company New Balance is suing a competitor in Guangzhou for using its brand name. The case does not lead anywhere for the US company, and business analyst Shaun Rein explains in Fortune why legal action sometimes can be counterproductive in China. Fighting for China to change might not work.

What to do on cross-border fraud – Mark Schaub

Cross-border fraud in China is on the rise, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub in Lexology. And when it happens, you should take action right away. First he paints what could happen.

US takes on Chinese fraudsters – Paul Gillis

Recent action by US authorities against ZTE and the Bank of China shows that a tough line with Chinese fraudsters works, writes accounting professor Paul Gillis on his weblog. “Chinese regulators are …protecting Chinese fraudsters and thereby creating a safe harbor for those who wish to commit fraud against US investors.”

The slow but sure growth of more independent courts – Ian Johnson

Despite recent crackdowns on feminists and human rights activists, China´s judicial systems is slowly but surely moving into a more independent force in China´s bureaucracy, says Judge Jiang Huiling of the Supreme Court in an interview with journalist Ian Johnson for the New York Times. Courts get more autonomy, be it limited.

Death penalty: the dropping numbers – Zhang Lijia

While China is still executing more prisoners than any other country, those numbers are dropping fast. Author Zhang Lijia looks at the sometimes fierce debate on capital punishment in China for the IA-forum. Most Chinese support the death penalty, but that support is dropping fast, she writes.