Category Archives: investments

How China became a politicized society – Shaun Rein

Known as the ultimate consumer guru, business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, now turned to politics in China, he explains at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club. In the past you could make a lot of money, no questions asked, he tells. Now you can still make money, but not that much and you need much more political sensitivity, he says. The pros and cons of Xi Jinping’s anti-corruption drive.

How to make money in China – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explained at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club how foreign companies become winners and losers in China. The “methodical, systematic plan” to garner support for the One Belt, One Road initiative was the result of a “divide and conquer” strategy on the part of the Chinese government, he said.

Bike-sharing: only at the start of their development – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing companies in China had a rough year, combining huge investments and limited returns. Smaller ones went bankrupt and market leaders Mobike and Ofo are rumored to discuss a merger. Peking University investment professor Jeffrey Towson still see enough room for success, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Management skills needed for China’s outbound investments – Shaun Rein

One of the key barriers in China’s massive outbound investment programs, like One Belt, One Road (OBOR) is the lack of management talents, tells author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order on the Human Resources page at LinkedIn. “Private Chinese companies have the capital and will pay for consulting services, especially companies in the tech sector.”

Will bike-share firms merge? Not yet – Jeffrey Towson

Will Mobike and Ofo, China’s largest bike-sharing companies merge, like car-sharing firm did in the past? Not yet, says Peking University professor Jeffrey Towson. International expansions goes well, capital is freely available, and a crippling price war has not yet emerged, he argues.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.

Is the China-US tension inevitable? – Shaun Rein

That is one of the key questions Shaun Rein asks in his upcoming book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. On his LinkedIn page he invites you to discuss that important questions. Some of the participants might win a digital copy of the book.

The debate on One Belt, One Road – Zhang Ying

The new Marshall Plan or a sneaky way China wants to conquer the world? The opinions on China’s massive One Belt, One Road program go into both directions. RSM professor Zhang Ying summarizes both views on China’s investment program that is changing the world, for Friends of Europe.

Trump: a bit of business, few jobs from China – Paul Gillis

The result of Donald Trump’s visit to China has been underwhelming, especially when some of the published deals were put under scrutiny. Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis looks at the Washington Post and the opening of financial markets where foreign firms could get a majority share.

Why e-readers are doing well in China – Shaun Rein

The Hong Kong IPO by Tencent’s China Literature, driving on a Chinese e-reader, was a big hit, while e-readers like Amazon Kindle are clearly over their highpoint. Business analyst Shaun Rein explains in CNNMoney why e-readers go like crazy in China.