Category Archives: civil society

Beijing: the center of spirituality – Ian Johnson

Beijing is regaining its position of China’s spiritual universe, writes author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the New York Times. While much of its past has been destroyed, the city where Johnson lives is now regaining its position of China’s spiritual capital. A struggle between commerce, communist and traditional values.

A spiritual revival changes China – Ian Johnson

Hundreds of millions Chinese turn to religion, as part of a spiritual revival, tells author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao to CBN. “While the government remains deeply suspicious of China’s religious revival, Johnson says it hasn’t stopped people from exploring matters of faith.”

Illegal churches: large, and condoned by the government – Ian Johnson

Not registered gatherings of religious believers have been a major force in the growing search for religion in China, but – says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the Atlantic – they have largely been condoned by the government, and Johnson does not believe that might change.

China’s search for a moral foundation – Ian Johnson

To get rich is glorious was China’s leading principle for decades, but slowly the country starts to search for a moral foundation, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao to PJMedia. “According to Johnson, China lacks the mechanisms the U.S. has available for creating social change. In China.”

Religion: ways for a better society – Ian Johnson

Author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao discusses Taoism, Christianity and Buddhism and how they help Chinese citizens’ ideals and hopes for a better society at the Asia Society.

When your stomach is full, you start thinking about sex – Zhang Lijia

Zhang Lijia, author of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China discusses at TimeOut Shanghai her book, the growth of prostitution and how it relates to women’s lives. “When your stomach is full, you start thinking about sex.”

Chinese, using religion to make sense out of their world – Ian Johnson

The South China Morning Post reviews Ian Johnson’s book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao and delves into the hearts and souls of the growing number of religious believers in China.

Boycotting United might be tough – Shaun Rein

United Airlines caused an uproar among its customers in China by forcefully removing a Chinese-American doctor. But calls for a boycott be understandable, but hard to execute, says business analyst Shaun Rein to BuzzFeed.

The complex face of religion in China – Ian Johnson

The Guardian praises Ian Johnson’s book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao and his well-documented tour along Taoist musicians, rebel Christians and celebrity Zen Buddhists, and where the CCP is still firmly in charge.

China’s return to soul-searching – Ian Johnson

China’s emerging religious experiences have often been misunderstood by the West, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in an interview with the New York Times. “I think the government is happy to see these things grow—almost as a form of stability.”