Category Archives: business

Why the sex industry boomed in China – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel, a book on prostitution in China, divided into the current sex industry and explains to Brave Media why it boomed. Earnings can be ten times as high compared to a factory job, she says.

Making maps: key for self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

Map makers have always found legal restrictions by the Chinese government as a barrier on their way. But now the country wants to become a leader in self-driving cars, Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub expects fast changes in the legal bureaucracy for maps, he tells at China Law Insight. Restrictions for foreign investors might stay in place, he fears.

How bike-sharing might work – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing firms like Mobike and Ofo might work out, explains Jeffrey Towson, investment professor at the Peking University. “It is unusual but not crazy,” he tells about the pervasive marketing strategy of bike-sharing. Independent assets moving around might just be the new thing.

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi top 2017 best Chinese unicorns – Rupert Hoogewerf

Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Xiaomi made it to the top-3 Chinese unicorns in 2017 on a list of 120 most successful unicorns in Greater China, announced the Hurun Greater China Unicorn 2017 Index last week. Beijing is leading the pack, says Hurun founder Rupert Hoogewerf, followed by Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Hangzhou. Keeping up with the amazing growth is tough, Hoogewerf tells AsiaVenturepedia.

Why the Chinese censor might not like my book – Shaun Rein

How to make money in China, and how the country works as a powerbroker are the key subjects of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order by author Shaun Rein. For NPR he tells what companies are doing well, but also why the Chinese censor might ban his book, as they did with previous ones.

How China’s state and consumer wallets relate – Shaun Rein

China is using its growing state power to put pressure on other countries and companies, but it is not only the government, argues business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. The government has become very sophisticated in using also the consumer wallets to put pressure on foreign brands and tourist destinations, he tells The Diplomat.

How China became a politicized society – Shaun Rein

Known as the ultimate consumer guru, business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, now turned to politics in China, he explains at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club. In the past you could make a lot of money, no questions asked, he tells. Now you can still make money, but not that much and you need much more political sensitivity, he says. The pros and cons of Xi Jinping’s anti-corruption drive.

Why the World Internet Conference mattered – William Bao Bean

The World Internet Conference in Wuzhen has long been derived as part of China’s propaganda tool. But those days are over, writes William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelerator, who attended the conference last month, together with IT leaders from the US and China, he writes in Medium. “It is going to be a wild ride.”

What do Chinese companies do different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.

How to make money in China – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explained at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club how foreign companies become winners and losers in China. The “methodical, systematic plan” to garner support for the One Belt, One Road initiative was the result of a “divide and conquer” strategy on the part of the Chinese government, he said.