Category Archives: books

Brainpower: How China changes the world – Jeffrey Towson

Apple’s Steve Jobs was the first American CEO to discovered China’s massive brainpower potential when he got the first iPhone produced in six weeks time, by 200,000 workers and 8,700 engineers. China’s massive brainpower is a disrupting force for the world, says Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson, co-author of The One Hour China Book (2017 Edition) on his weblog.

Silkroad, a short story – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia, author of the bestseller Lotus: A Novel, wrote a short story, the Silk Road, for Discovery the magazine of Cathay Pacific and tells in an interview about her preferences while traveling and a new book project on China’s left-behind children.

China’s push for dominance – Ian Johnson on Howard French’ latest book

What is China up to is a question that is more often asked than answered. Journalist Howard French’s book Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power certainly has not the most benign take on the country’s ambitions. Fellow author Ian Johnson reviews the book for Chinafile.

China’s geopolitical adventures in Africa – Howard French

Unlike the remembrance of the former colonial forces in Africa, China’s current geopolitical adventures into the continent “Africans’ view of China “is still positive, but not as exuberant as it was”. says Howard French, author of China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa to Today Online.

Stormy times ahead for China – Howard French

A relative slow growth, a rapidly aging population in an unprecedented demographic transition, and no serious social safety net. Author Howard French of Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power calls at the Asia Society the next 10, 15 years the most dangerous for China.

Accident triggers national debate on morality – Ian Johnson

Shocking footage of a traffic accident, where nobody came to the rescue of the female victim, triggered off a national debate on the state of morality in China. Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao looks at the different viewpoints of the debate, for the New York Times.

China: the land of the soft openings – Ian Johnson

Western analysts often miss the point, when they look at the way China conducts business, says China watcher Andrew Batson at his weblog, and he points at an interesting aside in Ian Johnson’s book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao , when he writes about soft openings in China. Case in point: comments on China’s One-Belt, One-Road initiative. Batson: ” It’s already clear it’s the China book of the year.”

Does Alibaba’s merchandise deal with Pokemon makes sense? – Shaun Rein/Jeffrey Towson

Alibaba Pictures has expanded its merchandise market with a new deal for the successful Japanese Pokemon. But experts differ on the question such a more makes sense for Alibaba Pictures. A diversion from its core business, says business analyst Shaun Rein. But Beidu business professor Jeffrey Towson lauds the effort for a comprehensive approach of the total value chain, he tells the 6th Tone.

Why advertising does not work in China – Tom Doctoroff

China’s consumers have always been very suspicious of any top-down broadcasting, says marketing guru Tom Doctoroff. Anything that looks like spoon-fed propaganda does not work. Advertising can work, but it is a trick country, and easy to get it wrong, he says.

Women in China’s market economy – Zhang Lijia

The Times Literary Supplement reports on an evening with author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China recently in London. One of the subjects: how did Chinese women fare under the market economy, introduce by Deng Xiaoping. About the government as a big boys’ club.