Category Archives: books

The blurring online lines between personal and business – Shaun Rein

Communication in China has changed into a completely different ball game, most Western visitors fail to get. Especially the blurring line between personal and business communication is key to understand, says business analyst Shaun Rein at Knowledge CKGSB. For example for recruiting.

The first fallout of the CUP censorship – Ian Johnson

The decision by the Cambridge University Press to bow to Chinese censorship and block over 300 articles on its China site has shocked the academic world. Journalist Ian Johnson , author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, reports on the issue for the New York Times and tested from Beijing what he could no longer get.

More academic censorship likely – Victor Shih

The move by the Cambridge University Press to censor over 300 articles from its China website is most likely only the beginning of more government-led curtailing, says associate professor Victor Shih, author of Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation to Reuters. Shih himself had two article published at the site.

Buddhism and freedom in prostitution – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China discusses Buddhism, freedom and fun as part of the background for her book with Radii China. “Without the inhibition of writing in my mother tongue, I can take an adventure in my adopted language” .

Ownership companies mostly remains opaque – Victor Shih

HNA was the last in a row of Chinese conglomerates, losing support from their most important financial backers. In the slipstream details emerged about the hidden ownership structure behind HNA. But most of these ownership relations remain opaque says political analyst Victor Shih to Fortune.

Online literature writers make fortunes – Rupert Hoogewerf

While much of the book publishers try to get their act together now readers go online, China boast even a top ten of literature writers, earning more than US$150 million each. Chief researcher Rupert Hoogewerf explains to Global Times why the Harry Potter franchise did so well, also in China.

At the end of a century of shame – Howard French

After a century of submission under foreign powers, China is winning back its old glory, and its influence in the region and the world, writes Howard French, author of Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power at the New York Times.

Xi Jinping has few friends in the Party – Victor Shih

President Xi Jinping’s position at the helm of his country seems pretty secure, says political analyst Victor Shih, author of Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation to the Economist. Although, his support at the next layer in the Party seems pretty meagre, he adds.

Brainpower: How China changes the world – Jeffrey Towson

Apple’s Steve Jobs was the first American CEO to discovered China’s massive brainpower potential when he got the first iPhone produced in six weeks time, by 200,000 workers and 8,700 engineers. China’s massive brainpower is a disrupting force for the world, says Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson, co-author of The One Hour China Book (2017 Edition) on his weblog.

Silkroad, a short story – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia, author of the bestseller Lotus: A Novel, wrote a short story, the Silk Road, for Discovery the magazine of Cathay Pacific and tells in an interview about her preferences while traveling and a new book project on China’s left-behind children.