Category Archives: books

How China became a politicized society – Shaun Rein

Known as the ultimate consumer guru, business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, now turned to politics in China, he explains at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club. In the past you could make a lot of money, no questions asked, he tells. Now you can still make money, but not that much and you need much more political sensitivity, he says. The pros and cons of Xi Jinping’s anti-corruption drive.

How to make money in China – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explained at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club how foreign companies become winners and losers in China. The “methodical, systematic plan” to garner support for the One Belt, One Road initiative was the result of a “divide and conquer” strategy on the part of the Chinese government, he said.

Why Tim Cook kowtowed to China – Shaun Rein

Apple removed many VPN’s from its Chinese app store, and CEO Tim Cook joined China’s internet propaganda show last week. Author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explains in ChinaFile why Tim Cook got an audience in Wuzhen, and Google’s Sundar Pichai not.

“The War for China’s Wallets” now available – Shaun Rein

Shaun Rein’s long-awaited new book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order is now available at Amazon and possible a bookstore near you. “This book covers more geopolitics than my previous two books and looks at how China is cementing its power through economic carrots/ initiatives like One Belt One Road and by punishing countries like Norway and companies like Lotte that do not follow its wants politically. The book looks at how China is dealing with Southeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula, the Middle East, and how the US needs to respond,” he writes at the publisher’s website. 

The long-term effects of China’s religious revival – Ian Johnson

Religious persecution in China is high on the political agenda, but most people do not see how the country’s religious revival is going to change our relations in the long run, argues journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao at the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.

China: A fast changing society – Zhang Lijia

Stability is the key word for China’s political leaders, but when author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China looks back at her last thirty years for her life, she sees a unbelievable change, she tells in a wide-ranging interview in the Australian Financial Review.

How China becomes a global leader in AI and driverless cars – Mark Greeven

China’s high-tech companies like Alibaba, Tencent, Xiaomi and Baidu are pushing the country to become a global leader by developing new business models, says Zhejiang University professor Mark Greeven, author of Business Ecosystems in China: Alibaba and Competing Baidu, Tencent, Xiaomi and LeEco to the South China Morning Post.

Why it is good to be an author in China – Zhang Lijia

While most of the media stress government control on journalists and authors, Zhang Lijia, author of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China, sees huge advantages too, she tells the blog Women and Gender in China (WAGIC). “Internationally Chinese women writers are almost invisible. This is another reason that I want to keep writing.”

Is the China-US tension inevitable? – Shaun Rein

That is one of the key questions Shaun Rein asks in his upcoming book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. On his LinkedIn page he invites you to discuss that important questions. Some of the participants might win a digital copy of the book.

The political dimension of China’s religious awakening – Ian Johnson

Most reviewers of Ian Johnson’s latest book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao focus on religion, while his book also has a profound political dimension. “Interesting that only a religious journal gets the deeper meaning of my book–not only as a challenge to religion and values, but also to China’s political order,” writes Johnson on Facebook.about the review in Voegelinview.