Category Archives: Beijing

Xi Jinping: more control on private companies – Paul Gillis

China is bringing more of its private companies to heel, both domestically and their international investments. Peking University accounting professor Paul Gillis sees it as an effort by president Xi Jinping to consolidate its power, he tells the VOA.

What works in China, might not work elsewhere – Jeffrey Towson

Whether bike-sharing is heading for a success or just a financial sinkhole is still unclear, despite a giant surge in VC funding. But Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson, a bear in this industry, is sure that it will not work outside China, because of the rather special situation in China, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Regulators start to punish auditors – Paul Gillis

China’s auditing regulators have issued temporary bans for the Chinese affiliate of BDO and Ruihua, the Chinese affiliate of both Crowe Horwath and RSM, over the past few months. Harsh measures to get auditing firms in line, even for international standards. Beida auditing professor Paul Gillis has his doubts, he writes at his weblog.

Why graduates prefer government jobs over private ones – Zhang Juwei

China’s best and brightest still prefer government jobs over joining the private sector, says professor Zhang Juwei, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences’ Institute of Population and Labor Economics to CNN. “The private sector in China is not very well structured or developed.” But government jobs are hard to get

China: the land of the soft openings – Ian Johnson

Western analysts often miss the point, when they look at the way China conducts business, says China watcher Andrew Batson at his weblog, and he points at an interesting aside in Ian Johnson’s book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao , when he writes about soft openings in China. Case in point: comments on China’s One-Belt, One-Road initiative. Batson: ” It’s already clear it’s the China book of the year.”

How a powerful Xi Jinping changes China’s policy making – Victor Shih

Since Deng Xiaoping China’s leaders did have relatively limited power. But all that is changing under current president Xi Jinping, writes policy analyst Victor Shih at the Policy Forum, and that might not be good news. “The policy-making environment has changed completely.”

The China Football Association is illegal under FIFA rules – Rowan Simons

Soccer in China is government organized and that not only leads to a bad quality soccer, it is also illegal under the FIFA rules, writes soccer expert Rowan Simons at the New York Times. Rowan Simons is chairman of China ClubFootball FC, the first amateur football network in China with foreign investors, and the author of “Bamboo Goalposts.

The revival of China’s traditional believes – Ian Johnson

Often reviewers tend to look at the emergence of world religions like Christianity, Islam and Buddhism, when they summarize Ian Johnson’s book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao. But the most moving chapter is that on the 80 pilgrim associations from Beijing, writes professor Richard Madsen in the Washington Post.

Prostitution: A mirror of society – Zhang Lijia

Prostitution is a mirror of society, tells Beijing-based author Zhang Lijia at the BBC. Her book Lotus: A Novel shows some of China’s most urgent problems related to prostitution: migration, the gap between men and women and moral decline.

The future of religion in China – Ian Johnson

Journalist Ian Johnson documented in this book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao how an estimated 350 million Chinese citizens found solace in religion, despite a ambiguous governments. In TimesOut Shanghai he tells how he feels that movement will develop in the future.