Category Archives: Beijing

The first fallout of the CUP censorship – Ian Johnson

The decision by the Cambridge University Press to bow to Chinese censorship and block over 300 articles on its China site has shocked the academic world. Journalist Ian Johnson , author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, reports on the issue for the New York Times and tested from Beijing what he could no longer get.

Buddhism and freedom in prostitution – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China discusses Buddhism, freedom and fun as part of the background for her book with Radii China. “Without the inhibition of writing in my mother tongue, I can take an adventure in my adopted language” .

The economic fallout of Xi’s powerplay – Arthur Kroeber

Chinese companies are running for cover as president Xi Jinping’s powerplay is also hitting the economy. China regularly pulls the reins, when too much financial power is flowing outside the state economy, says renowned economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® in the Financial Times.

Reducing risk, at the expense of reform – Victor Shih

China’s leadership is setting a new economic agenda halfway July, and much of the measures focus on the reduction on risk, even if – says political scientist Victor Shih at Bloomberg – that means announced financial reforms will be stalled.

VPN access key for innovation – Andy Mok

Panic struck when media reported China would ban all VPN activity in February 2018, allowing to circumvent China’s internet censorship. That was a shock for many, and seems to have been confused with a business licensing system for VPN’s. Whatever is going to happen, innovation and startups need unfettered access to VPN, says innovation expert Andy Mok to Bloomberg.

Xi Jinping has few friends in the Party – Victor Shih

President Xi Jinping’s position at the helm of his country seems pretty secure, says political analyst Victor Shih, author of Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation to the Economist. Although, his support at the next layer in the Party seems pretty meagre, he adds.

Silkroad, a short story – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia, author of the bestseller Lotus: A Novel, wrote a short story, the Silk Road, for Discovery the magazine of Cathay Pacific and tells in an interview about her preferences while traveling and a new book project on China’s left-behind children.

Xi Jinping: more control on private companies – Paul Gillis

China is bringing more of its private companies to heel, both domestically and their international investments. Peking University accounting professor Paul Gillis sees it as an effort by president Xi Jinping to consolidate its power, he tells the VOA.

What works in China, might not work elsewhere – Jeffrey Towson

Whether bike-sharing is heading for a success or just a financial sinkhole is still unclear, despite a giant surge in VC funding. But Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson, a bear in this industry, is sure that it will not work outside China, because of the rather special situation in China, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Regulators start to punish auditors – Paul Gillis

China’s auditing regulators have issued temporary bans for the Chinese affiliate of BDO and Ruihua, the Chinese affiliate of both Crowe Horwath and RSM, over the past few months. Harsh measures to get auditing firms in line, even for international standards. Beida auditing professor Paul Gillis has his doubts, he writes at his weblog.