Category Archives: Beijing

It’s the economy, stupid – Arthur Kroeber

Journalists and political analysts look at the political bubbles emerging from the ongoing meeting of the Communist party in Beijing, it makes more sense to look at the underlying economic currents, says renowned economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®. At NPR he looks back at some difficult years.

Conservative resistance against liberalization of the yuan – Victor Shih

Retiring central banker Zhou Xiaochuan called this week for the liberalization of China’s currency, the Yuan. But conservative forces might find this step from the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) a step too far, says financial expert Victor Shih to Bloomberg.

China needs revised traffic laws to push self-driving cars – Mark Schaub

When Baidu CEO Robin Li was arrested by Beijing police for sitting in a self-driving car, it was obvious the country needed an update of its traffic laws, just like the US, Australia and several European countries did have. Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub gives at his firm’s website an overview of what is needed to support the development of self-driving cars, including testing on public roads and setting standards.

The fast-growing housing market of Wuxi – Rupert Hoogewerf

Traditionally Shanghai, Beijing and Guangzhou were benchmark cities when looking at the housing market in China. But when you want to know where global wealth is growing fastest, you might have to look at a few unfamiliar names, including Wuxi, overtaking Hong Kong as the most expensive city, says Rupert Hoogewerf, chief researcher of the latest Hurun Report, according to the South China Morning Post.

Bike sharing: catching on – Paul Gillis

Bike sharing has met mixed reactions in China, including Beida professor Paul Gillis, who wondered earlier this year whether the investments made business sense, while they are already expanding internationally. The business case still has to be proven, Paul Gillis now admits on North Carolina Public Radio, bike sharing has changed his urban life for the better.

The first fallout of the CUP censorship – Ian Johnson

The decision by the Cambridge University Press to bow to Chinese censorship and block over 300 articles on its China site has shocked the academic world. Journalist Ian Johnson , author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, reports on the issue for the New York Times and tested from Beijing what he could no longer get.

Buddhism and freedom in prostitution – Zhang Lijia

Author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China discusses Buddhism, freedom and fun as part of the background for her book with Radii China. “Without the inhibition of writing in my mother tongue, I can take an adventure in my adopted language” .

The economic fallout of Xi’s powerplay – Arthur Kroeber

Chinese companies are running for cover as president Xi Jinping’s powerplay is also hitting the economy. China regularly pulls the reins, when too much financial power is flowing outside the state economy, says renowned economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® in the Financial Times.

Reducing risk, at the expense of reform – Victor Shih

China’s leadership is setting a new economic agenda halfway July, and much of the measures focus on the reduction on risk, even if – says political scientist Victor Shih at Bloomberg – that means announced financial reforms will be stalled.

VPN access key for innovation – Andy Mok

Panic struck when media reported China would ban all VPN activity in February 2018, allowing to circumvent China’s internet censorship. That was a shock for many, and seems to have been confused with a business licensing system for VPN’s. Whatever is going to happen, innovation and startups need unfettered access to VPN, says innovation expert Andy Mok to Bloomberg.