Category Archives: Didi Chuxing

What do Chinese companies different?

Slow, bureaucratic and not eager to innovate. In many ways Western companies seem different from their Chinese counterparts. Those Chinese companies are not only growing like crazy, they innovate fast and increasingly organize themselves differently, internally, how they invest in other companies and deal with their competitors. Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu are the biggest names, but under the private enterprises in China, they are certainly not alone. Take Haier, Huawei, Yili, Mengniu and Xiaomi.

Bike-sharing: only at the start of their development – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing companies in China had a rough year, combining huge investments and limited returns. Smaller ones went bankrupt and market leaders Mobike and Ofo are rumored to discuss a merger. Peking University investment professor Jeffrey Towson still see enough room for success, he tells the South China Morning Post.

How to deal with Chinese investors?

How to deal with Chinese investors? That question is asked more frequently by government agencies, startups, larger and smaller companies outside China, and even soccer clubs. Capital is flowing over from China to the rest of the world, partly through the massive One Belt, One Road (OBOR) investment program. But many Chinese companies, private and state-owned, also have their own investment agenda.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we offer a range of speakers who can help you to deal with that question. There might not be one answer, but as China’s economic standing in the world changes, looking for possible answers becomes more crucial for the world outside China.

The real force behind the sharing economy – Jeffrey Towson

The winner among the sharing companies is not the one who sells most rides, but the one who is best in collecting smart data, says Peking University professor Jeffrey Towson to the New York Times. “The fight is no longer over who has the biggest fleet,” Towson says, “but who has the smartest fleet.”

IT-investments: moving from solving basic problems to AI – William Bao Bean

A major shift is taking place in financial IT investments, tells William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelerator at CNBC. In the past 15 years VC’s helped to solve basic problems, he says. That’s done and we move now to AI.

China is a source of business models, not an easy market – William Bao Bean

China is, as the second largest economy, becoming an attractive source of new business ideas, says Shanghai-based VC William Bao Bean. Although the China market itself is a hard one to crack, for startups and larger companies, he tells in WebinTravel.

How to enter the China market – William Bao Bean

Innovation expert William Bao Bean, managing Director of SOSV’s Chinaccelerator, discusses entering the China market is tough, if not impossible for foreign players in many industries. In the Hutong podcast, William  looks at the way he trains Chinese startups for a global play, and foreign startups for the China market.

Why has Starbucks no real competitor in China? – Jeffrey Towson

Competition in China is rough and bloody for almost every company that even has the smell of possible success. But Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson did not yet find a reason why this rule does not apply to Starbucks. No competitor gets near the giant and – he wonders at his weblog – there is no real reason for that.

Didi needs to go international – Shaun Rein

After beating Uber, Didi Chuxing is now preparing to go international. And they have to, says business analyst Shaun Rein to Digital Trends, because at home they face growing governmental limits in expanding their business.

Why is Didi raising so much capital? – Jeffrey Towson

Since last year car-hailing giant Didi Chuxing has been raising over US$15 billion, even after it won the costly competitive struggle with Uber. Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson sees at his weblog four reasons why Didi continues to raise so much capital. Here are two of them.