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How China’s state and consumer wallets relate – Shaun Rein

China is using its growing state power to put pressure on other countries and companies, but it is not only the government, argues business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order. The government has become very sophisticated in using also the consumer wallets to put pressure on foreign brands and tourist destinations, he tells The Diplomat.

Migrants are the unsung heroes of China – Zhang Lijia

A visibly angry Zhang Lijia, author of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China, shows that the eviction of migrants in Beijing – described by the insulting term “low-end population – is raising the tensions in China’s capital. “We live in a socialist country,” she fumes at CNN. “They are the unsung heroes of our country.”

How China became a politicized society – Shaun Rein

Known as the ultimate consumer guru, business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, now turned to politics in China, he explains at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club. In the past you could make a lot of money, no questions asked, he tells. Now you can still make money, but not that much and you need much more political sensitivity, he says. The pros and cons of Xi Jinping’s anti-corruption drive.

Why the World Internet Conference mattered – William Bao Bean

The World Internet Conference in Wuzhen has long been derived as part of China’s propaganda tool. But those days are over, writes William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelerator, who attended the conference last month, together with IT leaders from the US and China, he writes in Medium. “It is going to be a wild ride.”

How to make money in China – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explained at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club how foreign companies become winners and losers in China. The “methodical, systematic plan” to garner support for the One Belt, One Road initiative was the result of a “divide and conquer” strategy on the part of the Chinese government, he said.

How Starbucks conquered a tea-drinking nation – Tom Doctoroff

Starbucks opened its largest outlet last week in Shanghai, and is moving from US to China as its largest operation. Marketing guru Tom Doctoroff looks at the strategy of the US coffee retailer who entered a tea-drinking nation, and gained tracking few foreign companies got, he explains in IdealsShanghai. “A Houdini act of Marketing”.

Bike-sharing: only at the start of their development – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing companies in China had a rough year, combining huge investments and limited returns. Smaller ones went bankrupt and market leaders Mobike and Ofo are rumored to discuss a merger. Peking University investment professor Jeffrey Towson still see enough room for success, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Management skills needed for China’s outbound investments – Shaun Rein

One of the key barriers in China’s massive outbound investment programs, like One Belt, One Road (OBOR) is the lack of management talents, tells author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order on the Human Resources page at LinkedIn. “Private Chinese companies have the capital and will pay for consulting services, especially companies in the tech sector.”

Why Tim Cook kowtowed to China – Shaun Rein

Apple removed many VPN’s from its Chinese app store, and CEO Tim Cook joined China’s internet propaganda show last week. Author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explains in ChinaFile why Tim Cook got an audience in Wuzhen, and Google’s Sundar Pichai not.

Will bike-share firms merge? Not yet – Jeffrey Towson

Will Mobike and Ofo, China’s largest bike-sharing companies merge, like car-sharing firm did in the past? Not yet, says Peking University professor Jeffrey Towson. International expansions goes well, capital is freely available, and a crippling price war has not yet emerged, he argues.

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